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Script for "USDA's Is It Done Yet? Food Thermometer Campaign"

 

Video News Releases
FEATURE SCRIPT - USDA'S "Is It Done Yet?" Food Thermometer Campaign
INTRODUCTION: Food safety experts at the U.S. Department of Agriculture are promoting a new campaign to increase use of food thermometers. The USDA's Patrick O'Leary has more.

Pat O'Leary, USDA (voice-over): A new U.S. Department of Agriculture food safety campaign is going national. At events featuring the Food Safety Mobile and its traveling mascots "BAC®" and "Thermy™," and through a Web site and other outlets, USDA is promoting the use of food thermometers to answer the question:

Kid at cookout: "Is it done yet?"

Diane Van, Manager, USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline: "Is it done yet?" is the key question when it comes to fighting bacteria and foodborne illness. The only way you can tell if meat and poultry products have been cooked to a high enough temperature to kill harmful bacteria is with a food thermometer. Hamburgers should reach an internal temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit, as should pork, veal and lamb chops; chicken breasts should reach 165 Fahrenheit; leftovers and casseroles - 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

Kid: "Is it done yet?"

O'Leary (voice-over): Food thermometers come in a wide range of types, some that even beep when the safe temperature is reached. The experts say you can't tell by looking - use a food thermometer to be sure. USDA studies show that one in four burgers turns brown before it reaches a safe internal temperature. The "Is It Done Yet?" campaign includes public service announcements and a Web site with useful information for consumers.

Van: Consumers can visit www.IsItDoneYet.gov to learn more about the use of food thermometers. They can also call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline for food safety information at 1-888-MPHotline.

Kid: "Is it done yet?"

O'Leary (voice-over): In Washington, for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, I'm Pat O'Leary.
Last Modified May 27, 2013