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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Teaching Workshop: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Non-ambulatory Disabled Cattle

Non-ambulatory Disabled Cattle

  • On January 12, 2004, FSIS issued an interim final rule that covered:
    • Requirements for the disposition of non-ambulatory disabled cattle.
    • As well as the prohibition of Specified Risk Materials (SRMs) in human food.

Definition

  • Non-ambulatory disabled cattle are:
    • [Cattle] "that cannot rise from a recumbent position or cannot walk, including, but not limited to, those with broken appendages, severed tendons or ligaments, nerve paralysis, fractured vertebral column or metabolic conditions."

BSE Risks

  • Surveillance data from European countries with BSE indicate that the cattle with a greater incidence of BSE are:
    • Dead cattle
    • Cattle that cannot rise from a recumbent position
    • Cattle that show clinical signs of a Central Nervous System (CNS) disorder
  • Testing
    • There is no sensitive and reliable test for BSE in live animals.
    • Post-mortem tests:
      • Can only indicate that cattle have the disease, at the earliest, two to three months before the onset of the clinical disease.
      • May show negative for an animal which does have BSE.

BSE Surveillance in Europe

  • Has also shown:
    • Clinical signs of BSE in non-ambulatory disabled cattle infected with BSE cannot always be differentiated from other conditions which may make the animal non-ambulatory disabled.

Non-ambulatory Disabled Cattle

  • Cannot be slaughtered
  • Applies to:
    • Federally-inspected plants
    • State-inspected plants
    • Custom-exempt plants
    • Imports
  • Include:
    • Animals which became non-ambulatory disabled on the way to the slaughter plant.
    • Animals which became non-ambulatory disabled on the plant premises, such as when they are being unloaded from the truck. Non-ambulatory Disabled Cattle
  • In rare cases:
    • A normal, healthy animal sustains acute injury on the way to the knock box. The FSIS veterinarian can allow the animal to proceed to post-mortem.

Cattle Prohibited from Slaughter

  • Before January 12, 2004:
    • Dead (other than from slaughter)
    • Dying
    • Showing clinical signs of Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders
  • Added on January 12, 2004:
    • Non-ambulatory disabled cattle
  • All non-ambulatory disabled cattle presented for slaughter will be condemned.
    • They cannot be taken into the plant for slaughter or be conveyed to any part of the plant used for edible products.
  • Plant must:
    • Humanely handle, euthanize, and remove them in a timely manner so that an insanitary condition does not arise.
  • FSIS inspection personnel will verify that plant properly disposes of them.

Emergency Slaughter

  • Cattle can no longer be slaughtered under the emergency slaughter provisions.
    • Includes ambulatory cattle, as well as non-ambulatory disabled.
    • Previously allowed under Code of Federal Regulations 311.27.

General FSIS Inspection Procedures

  • FSIS veterinarian:
    • Conducts ante-mortem inspection on all abnormal cattle presented for slaughter.
    • Condemns all non-ambulatory disabled cattle.
    • Condemns all cattle showing CNS symptoms, even if animal is ambulatory.
  • Non-ambulatory disabled cattle cannot enter plant.

Removal for Other than Slaughter

  • Owner or plant can request that condemned cattle be set apart and held for treatment.
  • If livestock are removed for reasons other than slaughter, owner or plant must obtain permission from the local, State, or Federal livestock sanitary official having jurisdiction.

Residue Issues

  • Residue testing will continue as before on all cattle presented for slaughter.
  • FSIS is concerned about the use of anti-inflammatory agents to assist animals in remaining ambulatory.
    • FSIS will continue special projects for these compounds and incorporate them into the enforcement program as soon as possible.

FSIS Guidance

  • FSIS is continuing to issue notices and to provide answers to questions about non-ambulatory disabled cattle and other requirements published on January 12, 2004.
  • We are attempting to answer all questions, whether at Teaching Workshops such as this, through the FSIS website, or through our Technical Service Center.
Last Modified Dec 30, 2016