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FSIS

Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Assistant Administrator, Office of Investigation, Enforcement and Audit (OIEA)

William C. Smith

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Mr. William C. “Bill” Smith was named the Assistant Administrator for the Office of Investigation, Enforcement and Audit (OIEA) in the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) at USDA in December of 2005.  In this position, he manages the Agency’s investigation and enforcement resources, State and foreign audit programs, and litigation functions to protect public health and respond to food safety and food defense issues associated with the handling, sale, and distribution of meat, poultry, and processed egg products in-commerce. His staff of 136 investigators is tasked with ensuring compliance at over 150,000 facilities in commerce.  He leads the FSIS Public Health Information System (PHIS) with a focus on implementation and continuous enhancement.

Mr. Smith is a proponent of sound investigative methods as a solid investment in food safety and the prevention of illness.  He fosters strong working relationships with the U.S. Attorney’s Office and the Office of the Inspector General and ensures that parallel investigative procedures are used during investigations, thus building the foundation for a compelling case. 

Prior to his current role in OIEA, Mr. Smith served as Assistant Administrator of the Office of Field Operations (OFO) at FSIS.  He has 36 years of experience in inspection and enforcement of food safety and other consumer protections, from working as an in-plant inspector to positions in FSIS headquarters. He managed the launch of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) program in the late 1990s.  The rule clarified the respective roles of government and industry in food safety efforts.  The HACCP program has been a critical factor in the overall decline of bacterial foodborne illnesses since 1996.  

Mr. Smith graduated from Kansas State University in 1974 with a degree in Biological Science.

 

 

Last Modified Feb 05, 2014