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News Release

New York Firm Recalls Boneless Veal Products Due To Possible E. Coli Contamination

Class I Recall 045-2013
Health Risk: High Aug 9, 2013

Congressional and Public Affairs 
Richard J. McIntire 
(202) 720-9113

 

WASHINGTON, August 9, 2013 – United Processing LLC, a New York Mills, NY firm, is recalling approximately 12,600 pounds of boneless veal products because they may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, E. coli O145 and E. coli O45 the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. 

The following products are subject to FSIS recall:      

  • 60-lb. boxes of boneless veal

The products subject to recall bear the establishment number “M- 27450” inside the USDA mark of inspection on a generic box label. The products were produced on June 17, 18, 24, 28 and 29, 2013 then distributed to wholesalers in New York and California for further processing.                                                                                  

FSIS became aware of the problem during inspection program personnel review. The firm sampled the product per their food safety program, and inadvertently shipped the product into commerce.

FSIS and the company have received no reports of illnesses associated with consumption of these products.

Many clinical laboratories do not test for non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), such as STEC O26, O103, O45, O111, O121 or O145 because it is harder to identify. Infections with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli can result in dehydration, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps 2-8 days (3-4 days, on average) after exposure to the organism. While most people recover within a week, some develop a type of kidney failure called Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). This condition can occur among persons of any age but is most common in children under 5 and older adults. Symptoms of HUS may include fever, abdominal pain, pale skin tone, fatigue, small, unexplained bruises or bleeding from the nose and mouth, decreased urination, and swelling. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

Consumers and media with questions regarding the recall should contact the company’s plant manager Jon Gorea at (315) 768-7100, ext. 228.

Consumers with food safety questions can "Ask Karen," the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. "Ask Karen" live chat services are available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/recalls-and-public-health-alerts/report-a-problem-with-food

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.
Last Modified Mar 03, 2014