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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Export Requirements for Russia

RU-260 (Dec 5, 2014)

Asterisks (*) indicate the most recent revision to these requirements. To search, click on your browser's "Edit" menu, then click on "Find (on this page)". Enter "*" in the "Find What" field, then click "Find" or "Find Next" until all asterisks have been identified.

Russian microbiological and residue requirements for meat and poultry are provided in the Customs Union Decision 299. (Note: The mg/kg unit of measure under Permissible levels, not to exceed converts to parts per million, ppm. For tetracycline, .01 units/g is equal to 10 micrograms per kg which is equal to 10 ppb.) U.S. exporters of meat and poultry and meat and poultry products to Russia should familiarize themselves and be prepared to comply with these requirements.

Establishments exporting meat and poultry or meat and poultry products to Russia should review all material in the Export Library and attest that product offered for certification complies with the microbiological, chemicotoxicological and radiological requirements.


Eligible/Ineligible Product

Effective December 5, 2014 Russia has placed temporary restrictions on the import of poultry and poultry by products as well as prepared poultry products from the U. S. establishments to the territory of the Russian Federation.*

  1. Eligible
    1. Pork liver, heart, kidneys, pork fat (back fat, caul fat, cutting fat, leaf fat), cheek meat, head meat, tongue, backbone, brisket bones, bung, pig ears,pig feet, femur bone, hanging tender, hocks, jowl, neck bones, pancreas, skin, skirt/diaphragm, snout, tongue, spleen, tail, tendons and whole heads. These products must be produced under an approved Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) Export Verification (EV) Program for pork to Russia to ensure that Russia's tetracycline and microbiological standards are being met and, in addition, must be produced under the AMS Never Fed Beta Agonist QSVP Program . All pork liver, heart, kidneys and pork fat intended for export must have been from hogs slaughtered in an establishment eligible to export product to Russia from raw materials eligible for exports to Russia. The eligible slaughter and further processing establishment, including any cold storage facility approved to re-box pork products destined for Russia, must have produced the product under both AMS Programs. Information about the AMS programs can be obtained from the AMS' Web site: AMS Russia Pork EV and AMS Never Fed Beta Agonist QSVP.

      The USDA Export Verification (EV) Program: Specified Product Requirements for Pork to the Russian Federation provides the specific requirements for tetracycline and microbiological standards and the AMS Never Fed Beta Agonist QSVP provides the specific requirements for beta agonists.

      It should be noted that the EV and QSVP programs for pork to Russia do not require an AMS confirmation letter - Statement of Verification (SOV).

      Only these pork offals and fats listed as eligible must be produced from approved producers identified in the slaughter establishment's AMS EV and QSVP programs are eligible for export to Russia. The eligible establishment is responsible for identifying pork products eligible for Russia to ensure only products that conform to the requirements in the export certificate are exported to the Russian Federation. As part of their AMS EV and QSVP Programs, the company must maintain a documented product identification system to uniquely identify the product that is eligible for export to the Russian Federation. The unique identification system, which is determined by the company, must be transferable and traceable throughout production. It can be comprised of a list of specific products with unique products codes or alternatively, another identification system in a format determined by the company.

      The unique product identification system can be accessed by authorized FSIS inspection personnel from FSIS' Intranet site.

      If FSIS inspection personnel, whether at the eligible slaughter, processing establishment or cold storage facility, are unable to verify the unique product code or alternative system identifier or become aware of concerns that an establishment is not properly executing its AMS EV and QSVP programs, export certification should not be issued for the product in question and AMS should be notified at ARCBranch@usda.gov. Inspection personnel should include their immediate supervisor on messages to AMS. The following information should be included in the message:
      • Establishment name, address, and establishment number
      • Product type, product code, and quantity of product
      • Date of production, lot number, and shift
      • Date and nature of observation
      • Name of country product is intended for export
      • Export certificate number (if applicable)
      • Any other information to verify claim
      • Name of inspection official
    2. Veal byproducts such as achilles tendon, back strap, cheek meat, feet, femur bone, hanging tender, head meat, heart, kidney, liver, tail, skirt/diaphragm, skirt sinew, sweetbread, tongue, weasand and edible fat derived from formula fed calves, 3 to 8 months of age, which are slaughtered and fabricated on or after March 26, 2013 at the following establishment are eligible for export to Russia:

      Establishment 7857, Marcho Farms, Inc., Franconia, PA

      The beef and beef byproducts must be derived from cattle raised in the United States and must be processed in a manner to prevent contamination with brain, spinal cord, eyes, skull, and vertebral column regardless of the age of the animal. Eligible beef and beef byproducts must be produced under an approved AMS Export Verification (EV) program for beef to Russia. Information about the EV program for Russia can be obtained from AMS' Web site.

      Effective February 1, 2013, Statement of Verification (SOV) is no longer necessary for exports to the Russian Federation.

      Only beef products produced from companies with an approved AMS EV Program are eligible for export to Russia. The eligible establishment is responsible for identifying beef products eligible for Russia to ensure only products that conform to the requirements in the export certificate are exported to the Russian Federation. As part of their AMS EV Program, the company must maintain a documented product identification system (product list) to uniquely identify the product that has been produced under the EV program for Beef to the Russian Federation. The unique identification system, which is determined by the company, must be transferable and traceable throughout production. The unique product identification system can be accessed by authorized FSIS inspection personnel from FSIS' Intranet site.

      If FSIS inspection personnel, whether at the eligible slaughter, processing establishment or cold storage facility, are unable to verify the unique product code or become aware of concerns that an AMS approved EV establishment is not properly executing its EV program, export certification should not be issued for the product in question and AMS should be notified at ARCBranch@usda.gov. Inspection personnel should include their immediate supervisor on messages to AMS. The following information should be included in the message:
      • Establishment name, address, and establishment number
      • Product type, product code, and quantity of product
      • Date of production, lot number, and shift
      • Date and nature of observation
      • Name of country product is intended for export
      • Export certificate number (if applicable)
      • Any other information to verify claim
      • Name of inspection official
  2. Ineligible
    1. Effective August 7, 2014, all pork, poultry (chicken), and turkey meat are ineligible to export to Russia, except those that are identified in the Eligible list above. 
    2. The restrictions on poultry originating from Maryland are lifted effective July 10, 2014.  Poultry meat derived from birds slaughtered before April 10, 2014, and on or after July 10, 2014 is eligible for export.  Poultry meat derived from birds originating from Maryland and slaughtered on or after April 10, 2014 and before July 10, 2014 is ineligible for export to Russia.
    3. The restrictions on poultry originating from California are lifted effective July 21, 2014.  Poultry meat derived from birds slaughtered before April 21, 2014, and on or after July 21, 2014 is eligible for export.  Poultry meat derived from birds originating from California and slaughtered on or after April 21, 2014 but before July 21, 2014 is ineligible for export to Russia.
    4. The restrictions on poultry originating from Arkansas are lifted effective September 18, 2013. Poultry meat derived from birds slaughtered before June 19, 2013 and on or after September 18, 2013 is eligible for export. Poultry meat derived from birds originating from Arkansas and slaughtered on or after June 19, 2013 to September 17, 2013 is ineligible.
    5. Chicken liver, heart, gizzards and fat.*
    6. Turkey liver, heart, gizzards and fat. Turkey offal to be exported to Russia must be derived from flocks which have never been fed feed containing ractopamine. See Other Requirements, Part K.3. for additional information.*
    7. Raw, ground poultry containing Salmonella spp.
    8. Poultry without flock health certification (See Other Requirements).
    9. Beef and beef products, and all bison meat and bison meat products.
    10. Beef products containing vertebral column, including vertebrae of the tail, the transverse processes of the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae, and the wings of the sacrum.
    11. Importation of ground pork and beef, packaged in bulk form or in the form of meat patties, is prohibited by the Russian authorities.
    12. Lamb, sheep, and goat products.
    13. Consumer size packages of ground poultry, mechanically deboned poultry, and giblets are not eligible for export to Russia.
    14. Meat and Poultry imported into the United States from third countries
    15. Beef products originating from animals raised in states with counties which have had confirmed bovine cases of vesicular stomatitis within the last 12 months.
    16. All meat and poultry products in passenger bags from the United States is prohibited.
    17. Eligibility of equine products, including horsemeat, has not been determined at this time.  Information will be provided as it becomes available.  Until eligibility information is provided, export certification cannot be issued for equine products intended for export to Russia.


Labeling

  1. All meat and meat products exported to the Russian Federation in consumer ready packages must have Russian language labeling including the following if applicable:
    1. name of the product,
    2. name of the company (may be in English only),
    3. country of origin,
    4. metric weight,
    5. establishment number,
    6. conditions of storage,
    7. best before date or date of production and shelf life,
    8. ingredient statement,
    9. nutritional value, i.e. calories per gram (the designation need not be in terms of serving size), and
    10. instructions for use (for processed products).

    Russia permits the application of Russian language stickers to consumer ready packages in bonded warehouses at the port of entry prior to entering Russian Customs.
  2. Fresh/frozen Poultry Labeling Requirements - In addition to U.S. domestic labeling requirements, each carton must bear a label in Russian with the following information. Metric net weights must be indicated on the label and on the export certificate.
    1. name of company,
    2. name of product,
    3. establishment number,
    4. "Product of USA for Export to Russia",
    5. metric net weight,
    6. production date (day, month year), and
    7. use by date or expiration date (day, month, year); The expiration date for poultry parts is 12 months from the date of production. The expiration date for mechanically deboned poultry is 3 months from the date of production.
  3. Fresh/Frozen Pork Labeling Requirements - In addition to U.S. Domestic labeling requirements each carton must bear a label in Russian with the following information. Metric net weights must be indicated on the label and on the export certificate.
    1. name of company,
    2. name of product,
    3. establishment number,
    4. country of origin,
    5. metric net weight, and
    6. packing date.
  4. Conditions for use of Russian language stickers - Russian language "stickers" can be applied to containers without FSIS sketch approval of a labeling deviation if the container already bears an acceptable label and if a letter of guarantee is on file stating that the "sticker" is an accurate translation of the information required above.


Documentation Requirements

Pre-Notification of Export Certificates
Effective with certificates issued on or after August 6, 2008, Russia's Veterinary and Phytosanitary Surveillance Service requires advance e-mail notification of all scheduled shipments arriving by sea of U.S. pork, poultry, and beef, using FSIS Forms 9450-3, 9450-4, and 9450-5, respectively. It is the responsibility of the exporting establishment or exporter to assure that notification is provided. Exporters should coordinate closely with the exporting establishment to ensure that proper notification has been made. Notification must be received at the address provided in the instructions below prior to arrival of the product in Russia.

The export establishments will send emails with attached PDF of the export certificate as follows:

  1. Email Submission Requirements:
    1. The subject line of the email format: "EXPORT CERTIFICATE [Enter Unique RFA or RFP Six-Digit Export Certificate Number] FOR ESTABLISHMENT # [Enter Establishment Number Where Certificate was Issued]". The words EXPORT CERTIFICATE and FOR ESTABLISHMENT must be included in the subject line.
    2. Each email will have only one attachment, one email per export certificate
    3. The attachment must be a PDF format of the scanned Export Certificate
    4. The attachment naming format: "[Export Certificate Number, RFA- or RFP-XXXXXX].pdf"
  2. Scan section 1, 2 and 3 of FSIS Forms 9450-3, 9450-4, or 9450-5, folding the certificate under as necessary.
  3. Send emails to ExportCertificates@fsis.usda.gov.


In the near future, notification must be provided via the Electronic Trade Document Exchange (eTDE) System. The eTDE system will allow a PDF of the relevant certificates to be viewed on the eTDE website by registered Russian Veterinary and Phytosanitary Surveillance Service officials.

This information may be provided by the exporting establishment or the exporter. To prepare for the pending implementation of the mandatory use of eTDE to meet the advance notification requirement, all establishments eligible to ship to Russia must register with eAuthentication as well as in the eTDE system by February 1, 2013 in order to upload certificates into the eTDE system. Once eDTE is implemented, export certificates not pre-notified using eTDE will experience additional delays at Russia's ports of entry. Therefore, exporters are encouraged to register to use the eTDE system as soon as possible to eliminate the possibility of additional delays for this reason.

Individuals at exporting establishments and export companies will need to register for an account with USDA eAuthentication as well as in the eTDE system in order to upload certificates into the eTDE system. Detailed instructions for registration and fact sheets on the eTDE system are available on the USDA Web site at http://www.etde.usda.gov/etdehelpcenter.aspx.

Certification Requirements

Advisory - Import permits should be dated in advance of shipping and copies of export documents should be sent with the ship. Original documents are not required to be on the ship.

  1. Raw poultry - Please refer to the PLANTS ELIGIBLE TO EXPORT SECTION (below) for current information about plant eligibility.
    1. Obtain carbon set FSIS 9450-4 (03/03/2011), Veterinary Certificate for Export of Poultry Meat to the Russian Federation.
    2. Obtain the Letterhead Certificate for Pathogen Reduction Treatment Used for Poultry and Poultry Products Exported to the Russian Federation, which must also accompany FSIS 9450-4. Note that the FSIS Public Health Veterinarian must identify the pathogen reduction treatments(s) used on the poultry to be exported under the accompanying FSIS 9450-4 certificate by circling the appropriate ingredient(s).
    3. A guideline for 9450-4 has been developed to assist in the preparation of this certificate. This certificate has a preprinted certificate number and is a controlled document. FSIS Form 9060-5, Meat and Poultry Certificate of Wholesomeness should not be issued.
    4. If necessary, obtain carbon set FSIS 9450-4B (06/11/2010), Continuation Sheet for the Veterinary Certificate for Export of Poultry Meat to the Russian Federation. Single sheet versions of these certificates must not be used.
    5. FSIS Veterinarian signatures
      1. The FSIS 9450-4 requires two FSIS veterinary signatures. The first signature should be provided according to current export certification procedures. The FSIS 9450-4B requires only one signature and must be signed at the same time the first signature is provided on the FSIS 9450-4. The triplicate copies of these certificates must be retained by FSIS after the first signature.
      2. In situations where product is loaded for break bulk shipments or when ocean vessel containers are loaded at non-FSIS locations, AMS must receive the 9450-4 (photo copy or fax is acceptable) to provide them information concerning the shipment they are contracted to certify. The second signature on the 9450-4 must be provided only after confirmation of the status of the product and the condition of the container or ship according to the AMS Russian Export Certification Program. Upon receipt of a signed PY 210 (original - copy or fax is acceptable). Poultry Products Grading Certificate, issued by AMS personnel as stated in the AMS program, the second FSIS signature can be provided. Information about the AMS program can be obtained from AMS Poultry Grading at 202-720-4411 or by referring to the AMS Web site "Export Certification Program Russian Federation" http://www.ams.usda.gov/poultry. AMS also approves third party certifying contractors to confirm the status of the product and the condition of the container or ship. A list of the approved third party contractors can be obtained from the AMS website indicated above. In this case, the approved third party contractor will issue certification confirming the status of the product and the condition of the container or ship.
      3. In the case of product loaded into ocean vessel containers for transport to Russia at FSIS inspected establishments, both signatures on the 9450-4 should be provided after the container is loaded. The AMS program is not applicable in this situation.
      4. The FSIS rubber export stamp must be applied in the indicated space to the left of the second signature block on the 9450-4 at the time of the second signature. The stamp should first be adjusted to show no certificate number. The FSIS veterinarian providing the second signature must initial the stamp in the open area where the certificate number would normally appear. Stickers bearing the export stamp must not be applied to the export certificate. The use of a sticker rather than the rubber export stamp on the certificate could result in a refused shipment and delistment of the plant.
      5. The first and second signatures are not required to be made by the same FSIS veterinarian, but could be by the same person depending on the means of transport, the place of certification, and the location of the certifying veterinarian. After the second signature, FSIS retains the quadruplicate copy which should be maintained with other documents pertinent to the shipment.
      6. The duplicate copy of the 9450-4 and the duplicate copy of the 9450-4B, if applicable, must be on board the ship at the time of departure from the U.S.
      7. When entering the Date Issued on the Letterhead Certificate for Pathogen Reduction Treatment Used for Poultry and Poultry Products Exported to the Russian Federation, enter day, month and year format.
    6. Replacement of FSIS Form 9450-4 (03/03/2011)
      1. FSIS Form 9450-4 (03/03/2011) can be replaced up to the time of departure of product from the United States by returning the original certificate and at least the duplicate copy bearing the same serial number to FSIS. FSIS will replace the original with a new certificate with a different serial number provided that the changed information meets the criteria specified for replacement of FSIS Form 9060-5 found FSIS Directive 9000.1.
      2. No replacement certificate will be allowed after the product departs from the U.S.
      3. Call the Import Export Coordination and Policy Development Staff (IECPDS), Phone (202) 720-0082 or (855) 444-9904, for further information about replacement certificates at (202) 720-0082 or 1-855-444-9904.
  2. Raw pork and pork byproducts, including bacon and pork for retail sale. Effective July 1, 2010, a new edition (04/21/2010) of FSIS 9450-3, Veterinary Certificate for Frozen Pork Meat and By-Products Exported into the Russian Federation for Processing or Retail Sale, must be used to certify raw pork intended for export to Russia.

    A guideline for 9450-3 (04/21/2010) has been developed to assist in the preparation of this certificate. This carbon set certificate has a preprinted certificate number and is a controlled document. FSIS Form 9060-5, Meat and Poultry Certificate of Wholesomeness should not be issued. If a continuation sheet is necessary, obtain carbon set FSIS 9450-3A (11/16/2006), Continuation Sheet for the Veterinary Certificate for Pork Meat Exported into the Russian Federation. A watermark, the U.S. government eagle, must appear on the first page of these carbon set forms. The eagle watermark may appear at random locations on the page. Note: The carbon paper used with 9450-3 may not extend to all of the information blocks on the certificate. Certificate preparers should confirm that all information entered onto the original certificate is transferred to the copies. In addition, the carbon paper used with the 9450-3A continuation sheet may include the signature block. In those cases, the carbon paper must be removed from the continuation sheet set before the certificate is signed to ensure original signatures on each copy.

    Pork meat for further processing or for retail sale in Russia must be subjected to one of the time and temperature treatment for trichina indicated in Table 2 of 9 CFR 318.10. The time and temperature chart on the certificate must be marked to indicate the specific treatment used. Pork meat for retail sale no longer must be derived from carcasses individually tested for trichina when certified with FSIS 9450-3 (04/21/2010). It is not necessary for containers of treated pork to be marked according to 9 CFR 325.7, but it is the responsibility of plant management to assure the FSIS veterinarian signing the document that the swine from which the pork meat is derived and the product are eligible and complies with all certification statements. Records supporting the assurances by plant management must be available for review.

    The FSIS rubber export stamp must be applied in the indicated space to the right of the signature block on the 9450-3 (04/21/2010) at the time of signature. The stamp should first be adjusted to show no certificate number. The FSIS veterinarian signing the certificate must initial the stamp in the open area where the certificate number would normally appear. Stickers bearing the export stamp must not be applied to the export certificate. The use of a sticker rather than the rubber export stamp on the certificate could result in a refused shipment and delistment of the plant.
  3. Raw beef and beef byproducts- Obtain carbon set FSIS 9450-5 (05/25/2010), Veterinary Certificate for Beef and Beef By-Products Exported from the USA to the Russian Federation.

    A guideline for 9450-5 (05/25/2010) has been developed to assist in the preparation of this certificate. This carbon set certificate has a preprinted certificate number and is a controlled document. FSIS Form 9060-5, Meat and Poultry Certificate of Wholesomeness should not be issued. If a continuation sheet is necessary, obtain carbon set FSIS 9450-5A (05/25/2010), Continuation Sheet for the Veterinary Certificate for Beef and Beef By-Products Exported from the USA to the Russian Federation. A watermark, the U.S. government eagle, must appear on the first page of these carbon set forms. The eagle watermark may appear at random locations on the page. Note: The carbon paper used with the 9450-5A continuation sheet may include the signature block. In those cases, the carbon paper must be removed from the continuation sheet set before the certificate is signed to ensure original signatures on each copy.

    The FSIS rubber export stamp must be applied in the indicated space to the right of the signature block on the 9450-5 (05/25/2010) at the time of signature. The stamp should first be adjusted to show no certificate number. The FSIS veterinarian signing the certificate must initial the stamp in the open area where the certificate number would normally appear. Stickers bearing the export stamp must not be applied to the export certificate. The use of a sticker rather than the rubber export stamp on the certificate could result in a refused shipment.

    An FSIS letterhead Transfer Certificate of Fresh/Frozen Beef and Beef By-Products Intended for Export to the Russian Federation must be issued at the slaughter/cutting establishment when the product is transferred to a cutting establishment or a cold storage prior to export certification. The certificate should be issued based upon supporting documentation from plant management. An AMS Statement of Verification (SOV) is not necessary to issue the transfer certificate. FSIS export certification procedures, including the SOV procedures to confirm eligibility of the product, will be used when FSIS 9450-5 is issued at the cutting plant or cold storage. The completed original copy of the transfer certificate should be maintained where the FSIS copy of the 9450-5 are filed.

    Obtain FSIS Form 9060-5--Export Certificate of Wholesomeness, for products other than raw poultry, raw pork, and raw beef and the appropriate veterinary certificate. Additional veterinary certificates should be used when all products can not be listed on one form.
  4. Meat products and poultry products for pet food manufacture must be documented as follows:
    1. Edible product bearing the USDA Inspection Legend - Obtain FSIS Form 9060-5 and 9450-12 (4/18/2001), Veterinary Certificate for Raw Materials of Animal Origin for Pet Food Manufacturing Exported to the Russian Federation.
    2. Inedible product - Export certification of inedible products, other than technical animal fat (9 CFR 351) and certified pet food (9 CFR 355), is no longer provided by FSIS. Exporters should contact APHIS field offices to obtain information about certification of inedible products. A list of APHIS offices is available at APHIS' Web site.
  5. Signatures on Certificates.
    1. All certificates accompanying product into the Russian Federation are to be signed by an FSIS veterinarian.
  6. The number of the ocean vessel container must be indicated in the "Means of Transport" block on the appropriate FSIS 9450 certificate. The name of the ship should be indicated in the case of non-containerized (break bulk) shipments.
    1. If the container number(s) are known at the time that the product is certified for export, the exporter should indicate the container number(s) in block 14 on FSIS 9060-6, Application for Export Certificate. Also, the container number(s) should be included in the "Means of Transport" block on the FSIS 9450 certificate.
    2. If the container number(s) are NOT known at the time that the product is certified for export:
      1. The applicant completes FSIS form 9060-6, Application for Export to include all required information, and in block 14, enters the company name, contact person, address, and phone number of the company that will load the container. FSIS will then provide the appropriate FSIS Form 9450-# and FSIS Form 9060-5 (if applicable), allow product to be stamped with the export stamp, perform export inspection, and allow shipment of the product without signing FSIS Form 9060-6 and the corresponding 9450-# and FSIS Form 9060-5 (if applicable). For export of beef products, FSIS Form 9060-6 may be signed to permit the signed application to be submitted to AMS for acquisition of a statement of verification.
      2. The unsigned certificate and signed or unsigned application for export are to be held by the original applicant. When the container number(s) are obtained, they are to be entered in block 14 of FSIS Form 9060-6 and in the "MEANS OF TRANSPORT" block of the 9450-#.
      3. The applicant then requests signature of the FSIS Form 9060-6 by the inspector who provided export inspection. FSIS Form 9060-5 (if applicable) and the corresponding 9450-# can then be signed by an FSIS veterinarian.
    3. If additional space is needed in the "Means of Transport" block in the case of multiple containers certified with a single certificate, an FSIS letterhead certificate indicating the container numbers should be issued. The letterhead certificate should also indicate the certificate number, the date of the certificate, and the signature of the same veterinarian signing the FSIS 9060-5 and the FSIS 9450 certificates.
  7. Exporters are cautioned that consignee information on the export certificate should indicate the actual consignee taking possession of the product upon entry into Russia.


Other Requirements

  1. Shipping requirements.
    1.  Effective July 21, 2014, meat, poultry meat and related products transiting the European Union can be imported only in vehicles or containers sealed in the exporting country (the seal cannot be opened in the EU countries.) 
    2. Hold shipments (break bulk shipments) shipped from the United States must be delivered directly to the ports of the Russian Federation.
    3. Shipments must be accompanied by the original veterinary certificate.

      Non-compliance with the terms stated above may lead to the rejection of shipments or other sanctions. Finished food products in retail packaging labeled by the manufacturer, are exempt from these requirements.

  2. Written programs. Any establishment wishing to export poultry or poultry products to Russia must have a written program in place addressing how microbiological, chemicotoxicological and radiological requirements in the Customs Union Decision 299 for poultry and poultry products will be met.

    A copy of the written program must be maintained on file, readily available to both establishment and FSIS inspection personnel. The program requirements must be understood by establishment management and personnel.

    Examples of non-compliances identified by Russia during the past three (3) years are listed below.
    1. The following port-of-entry findings have resulted in restrictions placed on establishments or delistment of poultry establishments by Russia:
      1. Coccidiostats, including Nicarbasin, Narasin, Salinomycin and Amprolium
      2. Tetracycline-group antibiotics
      3. Chloramphenicol
      4. Salmonella
      5. Mesophilic Aerobic and Facultative Anerobic Microorganisms
  3. Poultry facility requirements
    1. All trash receptacles must be equipped with lids, including those in the product loading areas.
    2. It is not required that driveways and loading areas have paved surfaces or that no trash containers be located in the product loading or shipping areas. The driveways and loading areas of the U.S. poultry facilities exporting to the Russian Federation must be covered with hard-packed surfaces (i.e., gravel). The surface of the driveway and/or the loading areas must allow for cleaning (i.e., hot water) without the creation of conditions that result in plant insanitation. Russian Federation officials have indicated that the presence of standing water or mud is considered an indication of poor drainage and insanitary conditions. Trash containers may be located in the product loading or shipping area, provided they are equipped with lids.
    3. There must be physical separation between the area of receiving live birds and shipping of finished product. There should also be different driveways leading away from these areas. These driveways may merge inside the premise of the establishment where there is a common gate for entrance and exit. Note: Although not a requirement, Russian audit findings related to driveways for live birds and finished products that merge inside the premise or share a common gate for entrance and exit may have resulted in restrictions and/or delistment of poultry establishments.
    4. A designated medical professional (for example, a medical doctor, a physician's assistant, a registered nurse) must certify that, based on their review of confidential medical records on file, all named permanent and seasonal employees (either listed or included in a referenced data base) are not known to be suffering from diseases transmissible through meat, nor affected by any condition which would disqualify them for working or being present in any exported meat-handling area upon employment. This certification must be available for review. This certification is also required for cold storage employees who handle boxed product.
    5. Effective February 1, 2004, establishment personnel in slaughter, cut-up, MDM, and associated areas must wear appropriate garments (i.e., smocks) to cover street clothing, and dedicated footwear. (Production workers in rooms where product for export to Russia is produced must have dedicated footwear. Maintenance workers, other non-production workers, and production workers in rooms not producing product for export to Russia, are not required to have special footwear. However, it is recommended that these other personnel have dedicated footwear to address potential Russian concerns.)

      Dedicated footwear is defined as footwear prepared from materials easily subject to sanitary processing (cleaning, washing, disinfection). Dedicated, uniform footwear (i.e. rubber boots) must be provided by the establishment. The sanitation of dedicated footwear must also be provided by the establishment. Storage of footwear should be provided at the establishment. However, if storage for dedicated footwear at the establishment is not provided, then employees may store/wear the dedicated footwear off the premises of the establishment.

      The following provisions for care of dedicated footwear must be assured:
      1. Sanitation of footwear: Footwear should be free from visible dirt, blood, fat or other debris prior to entering the footwear sanitation system. This will be assured through supervisory controls and enforcement of Good Manufacturing Practices, with washing of footwear at wash stations if deemed necessary by the supervisor. Footwear sanitation systems will be located in areas where establishment personnel enter the evisceration, cut up, deboning, or other associated areas. Each employee moving through the footwear sanitation area is required to pass through the system in such a way that the sole of each shoe is coated with the chemical solution or foam.
      2. Eligible footbaths include: 1) footbaths built into the floor; 2) footbaths built on top of the floor; 3) foot mats containing a sanitizer; or 4) floor foaming systems.
      3. Maintenance of footbaths or floor foaming systems: Plant personnel must monitor footbaths and floor foaming systems on a regular basis.
        1. Regarding footbaths, the following procedures must be implemented:
          • The solution in the footbaths shall be replaced as necessary to assure an effective sanitizer concentration (using suitable analytical technology such as test strips or titration) and maintained at a level adequate to cover the entire sole of the footwear;
          • A daily logbook shall be maintained verifying that the appropriate level and concentration of the sanitizing chemical and time of exposure to the sanitizing chemical in the footbaths are consistent with the manufacturer's instructions;
          • A label of the sanitizing chemical and the appropriate mixing directions for that chemical must be kept with the logbook.
        2. Regarding floor foaming systems, the following operating practice must be implemented:
          • The chemicals in the foaming systems must be full strength upon application and foam must be visible when employees are present;
          • A daily logbook shall be maintained verifying that the appropriate level and concentration of the sanitizing chemical and time of exposure to the sanitizing chemical in the foaming system are consistent with the manufacturer's instructions;
          • A label of the sanitizing chemical and the appropriate mixing directions for that chemical must be kept with the logbook.

        (Under either footwear system, employees wearing dedicated footwear outside of the establishment building during the work shift must go through the sanitation process described in the Sanitation of Footwear section upon reentering the production room.)
    6. Verification: To assure compliance with the Customs Union Decision 299 microbiological requirements, poultry processing plants must assess the Total Plate Count (TPC) analysis for each consignment of chicken leg quarters or other poultry products under the oversight of an FSIS inspector. If TPC levels exceed 10 5 cfu/g (100,000), the product will not be eligible for shipment to the Russian Federation and the establishment management will investigate, implement appropriate corrective actions and make a record of the investigation and corrective actions taken.

      The TPC sample can be taken from the deep muscle sample obtained for the Salmonella testing required for export to Russia. Choice of laboratory and shipping of samples to the laboratory is the responsibility of plant management. However, the laboratories used must be participants in the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) Laboratory Verification Program.
    7. It is not a requirement that coolers and freezers be completely dedicated to product for export to the Russian Federation. The following criteria must be met:
      1. Coolers and freezers with one common room should clearly distinguish between storing different kinds of packed products, which prevent direct contact with other products. Designated areas in freezers must be provided for storage of poultry intended for export to the Russian Federation. Other products in the freezer must originate from countries and regions free from OIE List A diseases.
      2. In coolers and freezers with several rooms, separate rooms should be dedicated to storing poultry meat intended for export to Russia and the same type of product intended for sale in the U.S. or for export.
    8. A solid wall separating evisceration and cutting activities, with air temperature in the cutting room not exceeding 50°F (10°C), is not necessary if the sanitary procedures in the plant ensure that cross contamination does not occur. Product temperatures must be maintained according to 9 CFR 381.66. NOTE: Russian audit findings related to absence of a wall have resulted in restrictions and/or delistment of poultry facilities.
    9. Humidity and temperature must be measured in coolers and freezers, however automated measurement devices are not necessary. The measurement devices can be either permanent or portable. For all approved establishments, temperature and humidity records must be maintained for coolers and freezers beginning August 1, 2003. Record keeping may be automated or hand-written, and must be retained for 12 months.
    10. Products may move between approved establishments in order to complete all production processes provided that temperature requirements are maintained. Temperature recording devices are not necessary in transportation vehicles. In the case of transportation of product between establishments, product temperature records must be maintained at the destination establishment to confirm that product temperatures were maintained during transit. Record keeping can be automated or hand-written.
  4. Poultry flock health certification
    1. Flock Health Certification - Plant management must present, on a weekly basis, a Flock Health Certification document ( example of flock health certificate) to the IIC at the slaughter plant. This document is issued by an APHIS accredited industry veterinarian. The veterinarian must have Category II accreditation in the State where the flock is located to sign the flock health certificate. To determine if a veterinarian is accredited in a particular State, the contact information for location of offices in each State is available at APHIS' Web site.
    2. State Veterinarian's Report - On a monthly basis the State Veterinarian from the State where the birds originated must issue a statement ( example of State Veterinarian's report) that the 6 poultry diseases listed in the Russian certificate are not present in commercial poultry flocks in that State. The agreed upon definitions are those indicated in the State Veterinarian's Report. USDA and the Russian Federation have agreed upon the definitions of the poultry health diseases listed in the Russian certificate. In the event that laryngotracheitis or paramyxovirus has occurred in the State, then restricted counties will be indicated in the report.

      The report must be accompanied by a monthly status report on avian influenza (example of report on the status of avian influenza) within the State. The State Veterinarian's report accompanied by the avian influenza status report must be dated no earlier than 45 days from the date of certification. These documents should be kept on file by the IIC.
    3. Plant management must present copies of these documents to the certifying DVM, whether the certification takes place at the slaughter facility or at a cold storage facility, and provide assurances that the animal health documents represent the product presented for export certification. The product is not eligible for export to the Russian Federation without this documentation.
  5. Ante-mortem requirements. Establishments intending to slaughter poultry for export to Russia must pre-notify FSIS so that FSIS can specifically assign a public health veterinarian or other inspection program personnel under the supervision of a public health veterinarian to perform ante-mortem inspection on a representative sample of live birds from each premise, consistent with the methodology described in FSIS Directive 6100.3, Revision 1 (Ante-mortem and Post-mortem Poultry Inspection). FSIS cannot always guarantee that resources will be available; thus, establishments must work closely with FSIS on this issue. Establishments and FSIS will document that this ante-mortem inspection occurred.
  6. Poultry antemortem records FSIS Form 9061-2, Poultry Condemnation Certificate, must be completed for each lot of poultry. The following information must be entered in the Remarks section:
    1. The date of shipment,
    2. the identity of the grower and corresponding identification number,
    3. the results of the antemortem inspection
    4. and, if applicable, information regarding a second examination (if birds are held more than 12 hours at the establishment before slaughter).
  7. Poultry DOA procedures - If the incidence of dead-on-arrival (DOA) birds is 1% or higher on a flock basis, the plant manager must notify an APHIS-accredited non-FSIS veterinarian. The APHIS accredited veterinarian will evaluate the factors that may be related to the increase in DOAs. If the increase is related to an animal health issue other than an error in loading, extreme temperatures, transportation, or some other known problem other than animal health, the veterinarian will visit the establishment to necropsy the birds and collect tissue samples as appropriate. Alternatively, the veterinarian may direct a trained technician to collect tissue samples. If necessary, representative samples will be submitted to an appropriate laboratory for analysis. Necropsy findings and laboratory results, if conducted, will be documented in the antemortem records. If the veterinarian determines there is no reason to investigate the DOA birds because the probable cause was an error in loading, extreme temperatures, transportation or some other known problem other than animal health, the veterinarian or the technician will document the incident in the antemortem records. The accredited veterinarian will review and initial the antemortem records once every two months. This procedure should be documented and on-file at the establishment.
  8. Customs Union Decision 299 requirements specify a zero-tolerance standard for Salmonella in bulk comminuted poultry. FSIS advises that establishments should not offer raw bulk comminuted poultry for export to Russia unless the establishment has a written program to describe the controls and testing verification conducted by the establishment on bulk comminuted poultry. This is not a deep muscle test expectation.
  9. Establishments that produce mechanically separated poultry (MSP) for export to Russia can only produce MSP from birds slaughtered at the same establishment or sourced from other establishments approved for export of poultry to the Russia. Approved establishments cannot source from non-approved establishments at any time. Establishments that product MSP should keep records of the source plants of raw material.

    Metal detectors are not required on MSP production lines. However, each establishment producing MSP must have a well-documented quality assurance program that assures that no metal or other foreign substances are present.
  10. Duration that chilled poultry may be held before freezing or processing. Chilled poultry meat may be held for more than 48 hours if maintained at the temperatures indicated in 9 CFR 381.66.
  11. Laboratory testing of poultry meat
    1. Basic residue testing - A residue monitoring program, in addition to the FSIS National Residue Program, is required in order to be eligible to export to Russia. Plant management must take samples from birds from each farm which supplies birds for export to the Russian Federation.
      1. Heavy metal and pesticides
        1. Product is to be sampled from each farm producing poultry for export to the Russian Federation. Flocks in the farm system not destined for export to Russia may be omitted from heavy metal and pesticide testing if records are maintained to associate flock testing with finished product.
        2. Frequency of sampling - on a quarterly basis, samples from each farm are composited and sent to a laboratory.
      2. Antibiotic testing
        1. Product is to be sampled from each farm producing poultry for export to the Russian Federation. Flocks in the farm system not destined for export to Russia may be omitted from antibiotic testing if records are maintained to associate flock testing with finished product.
        2. Frequency of sampling - on a monthly basis, samples from each farm are composited and sent to the laboratory.
      3. Choice of laboratory and shipping of samples to the laboratory is the responsibility of plant management. However, the laboratories used must be participants in the AMS Laboratory Approval Program found at AMS' Website.
      4. Verification of residue testing prior to issuance of FSIS Form 9450-4. Test results must be presented from all slaughter establishments contributing poultry to the consignment. At the time of export certification, plant management of the establishment requesting export certification must present copies of the residue test results to the certifying FSIS veterinarian. These results should be kept on file in the government office.
        1. Heavy metals and pesticides - laboratory reports must be dated within 105 days of export certification.
        2. Antibiotics - laboratory reports must be dated within 45 days of the date of export certification.
        3. Residue levels must be below the action levels presented in the Laboratory Approval Program for the Analysis of Poultry Products Destined for Exportation from the United States to Russia."

        Note: Product can be certified even if residue test results are unavailable for all flocks contributing to the consignment as long as available test results are dated within the frequencies above at the time of certification.
    2. Additional residue testing
      1. Chloramphenicol- product is to be sampled from each farm producing poultry for export to the Russia. On a quarterly basis, samples from each farm are composited and sent to the laboratory. Laboratory reports must be dated within 105 days of export certification. See the laboratory approval program for information about laboratory eligibility.
      2. If the weekly flock health certificate indicates that bacitracin, virginiamycin or flavomycin were used in the production of the birds, residue testing must be performed for the drugs that were used. On a monthly basis, samples from each farm are composited and sent to the laboratory. Laboratory reports must be dated within 45 days of export certification. See the laboratory approval program for information about laboratory eligibility.
      3. If the weekly flock health certificate indicates that approved therapeutic antibiotics were used in the production of the birds, residue testing must be performed on each treated flock. On a monthly basis, samples from each farm are composited and sent to the laboratory. Laboratory reports must be dated within 45 days of export certification. See the laboratory approval program for information about laboratory eligibility.
      4. If the weekly flock health certificate indicates that organic arsenicals are used in the production of birds, residue testing must be performed. On a monthly basis, muscle tissue samples from each farm using arsenicals are composited and sent to a USDA verified laboratory. Laboratory reports must be dated within 45 days of the date of export certification. An establishment must test at least annually - if organic arsenicals are not used in the production of birds presented at the establishment, a composite sample of one leg quarter from 5 production days should be tested annually.
    3. Laboratory testing of turkey meat for ractopamine
      1. Verification testing
        1. Conducted by the establishment using a AMS-approved rapid screening method. A list of approved methods can be found at AMS’ Web site.
        2. One muscle sample from each flock is tested at the time of slaughter.
        3. The verification test must be sensitive to a limit of detection of 0.2 ppb (muscle) or 0.3 ppb (liver/kidney).
        4. Test results must be provided to FSIS at the time of export certification.
        5. Turkey from any flock whose verification test is positive are not eligible for export to Russia. Flocks from the supplier whose birds tested positive are ineligible until acceptable corrective actions are implemented by the establishment and verified by FSIS.
      2. Confirmation testing
        1. Sampling conducted by the establishment with oversight of FSIS Public Health Veterinarian (PHV).
        2. One muscle sample per month from poultry slaughtered for Russia.
        3. Sample containers and shipment costs are the responsibility of the establishment.
        4. The confirmation test must be sensitive to a limit of detection of 0.1 ppb (muscle).
        5. Testing must be performed in a laboratory operating under the AMS Laboratory Approval Program for Analysis of Beta Agonists. Information about applying for the program and a list of participating laboratories can be obtained from AMS’ Web site.
        6. The most recent test results must be provided to FSIS at the time of export certification. Results must be dated within 45 days of the date of export certification.
        7. Turkey from any flock whose confirmatory test is positive are not eligible for export to Russia. Flocks from the supplier whose birds tested positive are ineligible until acceptable corrective actions are implemented by the establishment and verified by FSIS.
        8. Turkey from any establishment whose confirmatory test is positive is not eligible for export to Russia until acceptable corrective actions are implemented by the establishment and verified by FSIS.
      3. Note: FSIS, SPHV/PHV assigned to the slaughter establishment is responsible for overseeing the collection, securing and freezing of the samples by plant management. Samples must be taken from turkeys to be slaughtered for export to Russia only. The weight/size of the sample collected can be found in the sample collection instruction from the designated lab. These samples will be sent frozen to the designated lab via overnight express mail in containers provided by the slaughter establishment and at the expense of the slaughter establishment. When samples are sent to the designated AMS approved laboratory for analyses, the sample must be packed and secured in a fashion which will prevent tampering during shipping. Temper evident seal with a designated seal number provided by the establishment will be applied to the shipping container and the same seal number will be written on the sample form which is enclosed in the shipping container with the sample. The packaged sample must be under control of FSIS until it is shipped. Plant management must use a company that will deliver perishable products in a timely fashion and must provide International air bill if the sample will be shipped internationally. Plant management will keep a record of the sample information which will include the sample collection date, shipping date, seal number, a copy of the completed sample form which was sent to the lab and a copy of the lab result. This information should be reviewed by FSIS when transfer certificates or export certificates are issued.
    4. Salmonella testing - Each consignment (product represented on the export certificate) of poultry meat for export to the Russian Federation must be tested for Salmonella and comply with Russian requirements.
      1. Salmonella sample - 25 grams collected aseptically from deep muscle tissue
      2. Sampling frequency - each consignment assembled for export to Russia.
      3. Choice of laboratory and shipping of samples to the laboratory is the responsibility of plant management. However, the laboratories used must be participants in the AMS Laboratory Approval Program.
      4. Salmonella testing results prior to issuance of FSIS Form 9450-4.
        1. Negative Salmonella test results for the consignment must be presented to the FSIS veterinarian before export certification can be provided. Identification of the consignment must be maintained until the test procedures are completed. Copies of the results must be maintained in the government office.

          If the initial sample taken from the deep muscle of the carcass tests positive for Salmonella, ten additional muscle samples of 25 grams each from not less than 10 carcasses will be taken and the tests repeated. If one of the 10 samples tests positive for Salmonella, this consignment will not be exported to the Russian Federation. Products prepared for export to the Russian Federation that do not comply with the Salmonella testing procedures are not eligible for the Russian Federation.
      5. Giblets, ground poultry, and mechanically deboned poultry must come from carcasses that have been tested on a consignment basis as described in a.-d. above. The Salmonella test result must be obtained from at least one carcass used in the production of the consignment.
    5. Listeria monocytogenes testing- Each slaughter establishment producing poultry for export to Russia must submit a 25 gram deep-muscle sample for Listeria monocytogenes testing on a quarterly basis. Laboratory results must be dated within 105 days of export certification. Negative test results must be on file at the establishment. Choice of laboratory and shipping of samples to the laboratory is the responsibility of plant management. However, the laboratories used must be participants in the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) "Laboratory Verification Program".
    6. Laboratory Approval Program - Basic residue testing, Salmonella testing, Listeria monocytogenes testing, and Total Plate Count testing must be performed in a laboratory operating under the AMS Laboratory Approval Program for Poultry Products Destined for Exportation from the United States to Russia.

      The following analyses have been incorporated into the AMS Laboratory Approval Program: chloramphenicol, bacitracin, virginamycin, and bambermycin (Flavomycin). Effective January 1, 2006, laboratories performing these analyses for poultry intended for export to Russia must participate in the AMS Laboratory Approval Program. Information about applying for the program and a list of participating laboratories can be obtained from AMS' Website

      The testing for therapeutic antibiotics indicated in the additional residue section above is not yet incorporated into the AMS Laboratory Verification Program. More information about that process will be provided as it becomes available. Until it is incorporated into the AMS program, laboratories doing the additional antibiotic testing and the Listeria monocytogenes testing must be currently participating in the AMS Laboratory Approval Program or be ISO 17025 certified. The following table indicates the analytical sensitivities required for each of the antibiotic methods.

      Analysis Sensitivity
      Chloramphenicol 10 ppb
      Bacitracin 280 ppb 0.02 IU/gm
      Virginiamycin 200 ppb (0.2 ppm)
      Bambermycin
      (Flavomycin)
      200 ppb (0.2 ppm)
      Ceftiofur -
      Enrofloxacin 300 ppb (0.3 ppm)
      Erythromycin 125 ppb (0.125 ppm)
      Gentamicin 100 ppb (0.1 ppm)
      Sulfadiamethoxine 100 ppb (0.1 ppm)
      Sulfaquinoxzlone 100 ppb (0.1 ppm)
      Penicillin 50 ppb (0.05 ppm)
      Tylosin 200 ppb (0.2 ppm)
      Neomycin 500 ppb (0.5 ppm)
      Lincomycin 100 ppb (0.1 ppm)
      Spectinomycin 100 ppb (0.1 ppm)
      Streptomycin 500 ppb (0.5 ppm)
  12. In order to regain certification by FSIS following a violation of Russian microbiological or residue requirements, an establishment will need to implement a substantive control program to address this failure.
  13. Radiological testing of poultry meat - Each slaughter establishment producing poultry for the Russian Federation will provide a statement of guarantee that their poultry meets the Russian Federation's radionuclide standards after documenting the results of the following survey program on an annual basis:
    1. Each establishment will submit a sample which consists of a composite of one leg quarter from 5 production days. The composite sample will be submitted to the appropriate or University radiation research facility for the total activity level screen using beta and gamma detection instruments.
    2. A report documenting the total activity in Becquerels/kilogram (Bq/kg) for each sample will be generated at the University radiation monitoring facility. This report will then be sent to the submitting establishment showing the total beta and gamma activity for each sample. Reports will be available to FSIS.
    3. A total beta and gamma activity screening measurement assures compliance with Russian Federation permissible limits of radionuclides (beta<80 Bq/kg and gamma<180 Bq/kg).
    4. Additional information about the radionuclide protocol, including a list of participating university testing facilities, is available from the USA Poultry and Egg Export Council at http://www.usapeec.org/.
  14. Russian Import Permits. The Russian Veterinary Service issues import permits for all poultry products entering that country. The Russian inspection officials have advised that U.S. exporters should check with the Russian importer to assure that the importer has an import permit. If the importer does not have a valid import permit, the product may not be allowed entry.
  15. FSIS Form 9450-4A (09/29/2011) - Transfer Certificate Fresh/Frozen Poultry Meat Intended for Export to the Russian Federation. This form has been modified to incorporate the USDA Logo on the form. Previous editions are obsolete. The completed original copy should be maintained where FSIS copies of the 9450-4 are filed.

    When export documents are issued from a cold storage or other non-slaughter establishment, alternatively to providing copies of the State veterinary report, flock health certificates, residue test results, Salmonella test results, and the PRT - the IIC at the slaughter establishment can provide FSIS Form 9450-4A for verification of the acceptability of these results.
  16. Trichinae destruction in raw pork meat for further processing or for retail sale.
    1. Raw pork meat intended for export to the Russian Federation for further processing or for retail sale must be subjected to a freezing regimen according to 9 CFR 318.10(c)(2)(iv) for destruction of trichinae.
    2. Raw pork must originate from an approved facility. Plant management must develop a control program to assure that only raw pork slaughtered, processed, and stored in approved establishments is certified for export to the Russian Federation.
    3. Box lids must be secured by tape, banding, gluing or other acceptable methods.
  17. Laboratory testing of pork and pork products for ractopamine
    1. Verification testing is to be performed as specified in the AMS QSVP program. Results of testing must be available for review by FSIS officials. If meat from animals that were raised by an approved pig supplier under the QSVP produces a positive test result, that product and other product from that pig supplier are excluded from the program until corrective actions have been implemented and verified as effective by AMS.
    2. Confirmation Testing
      1. Sampling conducted by the establishment with oversight of FSIS Public Health Veterinarian (PHV).
      2. One muscle sample per month from pork slaughtered for Russia.
      3. Sample containers and shipment costs are the responsibility of the establishment.
      4. The confirmation test must be sensitive to a limit of detection of 0.1 ppb (muscle).
      5. Testing must be performed in a laboratory operating under the AMS Laboratory Approval Program for Analysis of Beta Agonists. Information about applying for the program and a list of participating laboratories can be obtained from AMS Beta Agonist Labs.
      6. The most recent test results must be provided to FSIS at the time of export certification. Results must be dated within 45 days of the date of export certification.
      7. Pork from suppliers whose confirmatory test is positive are not eligible for export to Russia. Suppliers whose animals tested positive are ineligible until acceptable corrective actions are implemented by the establishment and verified by FSIS.
      8. Pork from any establishment whose confirmatory test is positive is not eligible for export to Russia until acceptable corrective actions are implemented by the establishment and verified by FSIS.
    Note: FSIS, SPHV/PHV assigned to the slaughter establishment is responsible for overseeing the collection, securing and freezing of the samples by plant management. Samples must be taken from pigs to be slaughtered for export to Russia only. The weight/size of the sample collected can be found in the sample collection instruction from the designated lab. These samples will be sent frozen to the designated lab via overnight express mail in containers provided by the slaughter establishment and at the expense of the slaughter establishment. When samples are sent to the designated AMS approved laboratory for analyses, the sample must be packed and secured in a fashion which will prevent tampering during shipping. Tamper evident seal with a designated seal number provided by the establishment will be applied to the shipping container and the same seal number will be written on the sample form which is enclosed in the shipping container with the sample. The packaged sample must be under control of FSIS until it is shipped. Plant management must use a company that will deliver perishable products in a timely fashion and must provide International air bill if the sample will be shipped internationally. Plant management will keep a record of the sample information which will include the sample collection date, shipping date, seal number, a copy of the completed sample form which was sent to the lab and a copy of the lab result. This information should be reviewed by FSIS when export certificates are issued.


Addendum Letterhead Certificate 

Pathogen reduction treatments 1 to 3 from the below list are known to be approved for use on poultry in Russia. The Russian approval status of the others is not determined, although all are approved for use on poultry in the United States. FSIS makes no affirmation as to whether poultry treated with pathogen reduction treatments other than 1 to 3 below will be accepted by Russia at this time.

The list includes both antimicrobial agents and acids used for pH control which are necessary for some treatments to provide conditions to make antimicrobial ingredients effective.

Ingredients used as part of a pathogen reduction treatment currently in use for poultry in Russia:

  1. Cetylpyridinium chloride
  2. Hydrogen peroxide
  3. Peroxyacetic acid


Ingredients used as part of a pathogen reduction treatment currently approved for use on food in Russia but not specifically approved for use on poultry in Russia:

  1. Acidic calcium sulfate
  2. Hydrochloric acid
  3. Sulfuric acid
  4. Citric acid
  5. Phosphoric acid
  6. Sodium bisulfate
  7. Acetic acid
  8. Octanoic acid
  9. Trisodium phosphate


Ingredients used as part of a pathogen reduction treatment approved for use on poultry in the United States but not approved for use on any foods in Russia:

  1. Acidified sodium chlorite
  2. Chlorine dioxide
  3. Chlorine compounds (calcium hypochlorite, chlorine gas, electrolytically generated hypochlorous acid, sodium hypochlorite)
  4. DBDMH (1,3 dibromo-5,5-dimethilhydantoin)
  5. HEDP (1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid)
  6. Hypobromous acid
  7. Lactic acid bacteria
  8. Lauramide arginine ethyl ester (LAE)
  9. Ozone
  10. Peroxyoctanoic acid


Prior to signing the Letterhead Certificate, the FSIS PHV will review the documentation provided by the establishment related to the pathogen reduction treatments used on the poultry included on the certificate. The PHV will circle the compound(s) listed on the Letterhead Certificate to indicate which pathogen reduction treatment(s) was used as either a pre-chill wash, a post chill wash or in the chill tank. 

Note:  If peroxyacetic acid is used as a pathogen reduction treatment and the peroxyacetic acid solution is a mixture of only the following ingredients (peroxyacetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid and HEDP), only peroxyacetic acid should be circled on the Letterhead Certificate. If additional ingredients are included (e.g. octanoic acid), then the additional ingredients should be circled, as well as peroxyacetic acid, on the Letterhead Certificate.

Note: If poultry and poultry products have been in contact with potable water that has additional chlorine added beyond that allowed in meeting the U.S. potable water standard during slaughter and processing operations, chlorine will be indicated on the Letterhead Certificate as being used to process the poultry along with the pathogen reduction treatments used as either a pre-chill wash, a post chill wash or in the chill tank.

Note: Chlorine can be added to potable water above the U.S. potable water standard if the solution is used in cleaning or sanitizing equipment without direct application to poultry except for limited and unavoidable situations during on-line application. Such use should not be considered application of chlorine as a pathogen reduction treatment to the poultry.

Note: There is a U.S. regulatory requirement (9 CFR 381.91(b)(1) to use chlorinated water containing 20 ppm available chlorine when reconditioning poultry. Establishments choosing to export reconditioned poultry to Russia treated with this chlorinated water must document the use of chlorine so that the compound will be identified on the Letterhead Certificate. As an alternative, the diversion of reconditioned poultry from Russian export should be included in the establishment's written program.

All FSIS requirements must be met regardless of which of the above treatment(s) is selected, including the conditions for use. In addition, FSIS performance standards must be met so an establishment needs to ensure that the selected treatments used on the poultry intended for export to Russia are effective in meeting the performance standards.

Reimbursable Services

The majority of the inspection activities required by Russia relating to the export of poultry and poultry products are reimbursable. The following specific inspection activities performed by IPP are reimbursable services. However, it is not an all inclusive list of inspection activities considered to be reimbursable services related to the export of poultry to Russia.

  1. Becoming familiar with updated requirements in the Export Library.
  2. Conducting and documenting ante-mortem inspection of all poultry flocks/lots.
  3. Reviewing the FSIS Form 9080-3 (12/10/2008), Establishment Application for Export, and comparing the information in the application against requirements in the Export Library.
  4. Reviewing and verifying the pathogen reduction treatments used on the poultry presented for export to Russia prior to circling the relevant ingredients on the Letterhead Certificate for Pathogen Reduction Used for Poultry and Poultry Products Exported to the Russian Federation are those that were used in the production of the poultry.
  5. Verifying that all of the Russian requirements, not related to the use of pathogen reduction treatments, have been met.
  6. Signing the FSIS Form 9450-4, Veterinary Certificate for Export of Poultry Meat to the Russian Federation.
  7. Signing the FSIS Letterhead Certificate for Pathogen Reduction Used for Poultry and Poultry Products Exported to the Russian Federation.
  8. FSIS oversight of collection of turkey samples for confirmatory ractopamine testing.


The amount of time necessary to conduct these activities should be recorded by IPP. IPP should refer to FSIS Directive 12,600.1 for specific instructions on how these reimbursable charges should be handled.

Plants Eligible to Export

  1. Plant Approval - Each of the lists below is independent of the others. Inclusion of an establishment on one of the lists does not confer eligibility to export to Russia products on other lists. All meat and poultry slaughter establishments, processing establishments, and cold storage facilities must apply by submitting FSIS Form 9080-3 (12/10/2008) - Establishment Application for Export - to be listed as eligible for export of meat, poultry and processed products to Russia. The form is available from the FSIS inspector. The completed form should be returned to the FSIS inspector. The approved lists will be updated as additional establishments are approved by the Russian Federation. Establishments submitting FSIS Form 9080-3 (12/10/2008) may be subject to audit by the Russian Federation.
    1. Raw Poultry
      1. A list of establishments approved to export poultry to Russia is available in the Export Library.
    2. Raw pork
      1. A list of establishments approved to export pork to Russia is available in the Export Library.
      2. Slaughter establishments, processing establishments, and cold storage facilities approved for reboxing must participate in an AMS EV program in order to be eligible for export pork to Russia.
      3. A cold storage facility that stores and ships product but does not box or open product prior to shipping does not have to participate in the AMS program.
      4. A cold storage facility that is approved for reboxing can be included in the slaughter establishment's EV Program. The cold storage facility must follow the procedures outlined in the slaughter establishment's EV Program.
    3. Raw beef
      1. A List of Approved Raw Beef and Cold Storage Establishments is available in the Export Library. In addition, approved slaughter and processing establishments must participate in an AMS, BEV program and be present on the Official Listing of Eligible Suppliers for USDA Bovine EV Program.
    4. Prepared products
      1. Effective May 1, 2010, no establishments are approved to export prepared beef products to Russia.
      2. A list of establishments approved to export prepared products to Russia is available in the Export Library. Only establishments on this list are eligible to export prepared products to Russia. Only prepared pork and poultry products and baby food containing beef imported from Australia and/or New Zealand and fully cooked, canned baby food containing lamb are eligible to export to Russia. Pork and poultry for further processing must originate only from establishments approved to export raw pork or poultry to the Russian Federation. Natural pork casings used in the production of processed products must originate from Russian approved U.S. slaughter establishments and be processed/selected only in the United States to be eligible for use in the processed product.
    5. Natural pork casings must be produced from intestines originating from U.S. slaughter establishments approved to export pork to Russia and must be processed/selected in the United States.

 

Last Modified Dec 05, 2014