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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Export Requirements for Canada

CA-155 (Aug 29, 2014)

Asterisks (*) indicate the most recent revision to these requirements. To search, click on your browser's "Edit" menu, then click on "Find (on this page)". Enter "*" in the "Find What" field, then click "Find" or "Find Next" until all asterisks have been identified.

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Eligible/Ineligible Products

  1. Eligible Product
    1. Beef and beef products derived from cattle of all ages.
    2. Meat, meat products, and natural casings derived from ovine and caprine animals slaughtered in the United States that are less than 12 months of age, and are produced under an approved AMS EV program for Canada are eligible for export to Canada. See Documentation requirements, Section A.10 and A.13 for certification requirements.

      Additional information about the EV program and a list of EV approved establishments can be obtained from AMS' Web site.

      If FSIS inspection personnel become aware of concerns that an AMS approved EV establishment is not properly executing its EV program, AMS should be notified at ARCBranch@usda.gov. Inspection personnel should include their immediate supervisor on messages to AMS. The following information should be included in the message:
      • Establishment name, address, and establishment number
      • Product type, product code, and quantity of product
      • Date of production, lot number, and shift
      • Date and nature of observation
      • Name of country product is intended for export
      • Export certificate number (if applicable)
      • Any other information to verify claim
      • Name of inspection official
    3. Meat and meat products derived from bison or buffalo. However, Canada applies the same BSE requirements to these products as for beef and beef products. Since U.S. BSE regulations do not apply to bison or buffalo, meat and meat products derived from these species must be produced under an approved AMS EV program. See Documentation Requirements, Section A.9 for certification requirements.

      Additional information about the EV program and a list of EV approved establishments can be obtained from AMS' Web site.
    4. Meat products containing meat derived from animals of the sub-family Bovinae (cattle, buffalo, bison), and sheep and goats, originating in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, New Zealand or Uruguay and that are processed in U.S. establishments. See Documentation Requirements, Section A. 11 and A.12 for certification requirements.

      Australia, Canada, and New Zealand: All types of beef, lamb, and goat meat from Australia, Canada, and New Zealand are eligible for processing and export to Canada.

      Argentina, Brazil: Only boneless beef cooked in tubes, beef extract, and beef jerky from Argentina and Brazil is eligible for processing and export to Canada.

      Uruguay: Only boneless beef cooked in tubes, beef extract, beef jerky, and fresh boneless beef from Uruguay is eligible for processing and export to Canada.

      Chile: Only fresh/frozen lamb meat from Chile is eligible for processing and export to Canada.
    5. Natural Casings.
      1. Natural pork casings originating in the United States and Canada are eligible for export to Canada. The casings can be processed in Canadian approved processing plants in China.
      2. Natural bovine casings derived from animals slaughtered in the United States, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand are eligible for export to Canada. The casings can be processed in Canadian approved processing plants in China.
      3. Natural ovine casings derived from animals slaughtered in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and Chile are eligible for export to Canada. The casings can be processed in Canadian approved processing plants in China.
    6. Imported Meat and Poultry Product. Meat and poultry product imported from foreign countries and further processed in the United States is eligible for export to Canada subject to restrictions on ruminant products (see above).
    7. Mechanically Separated (Species)
    8. Powdered Liver. This product is classified as a meat product in Canada. Edible dried powdered liver must comply with the export requirements of edible meat products.
    9. Rabbit Meat and Rabbit Meat Products. USDA inspected establishments slaughtering rabbits for export to Canada must be able to demonstrate that the chilling procedures employed do not result in an increase in weight due to moisture retention.
    10. Ground meat may be exported from the United States to Canada. The type of ground meat, i.e., regular, medium or lean, must be identified in the product description on the export certificate (see Labeling Requirements).
    11. Freshly dressed carcass meat sprayed with approved pathogen reduction agents is eligible for export to Canada, provided final approval for this procedure is granted by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and subject to restrictions on ruminant products (see above).
    12. Meat and meat products derived from boars or cryptorchid pigs are eligible for export to Canada. Fresh meat from these animals may require specific labeling. See the Labeling Section (B.1.f.) for additional information.
    13. Pork and pork products.
    14. Venison legally imported from New Zealand and used as an ingredient in a meat product produced under FSIS inspection.
    15. Equine products, including horsemeat.
    16. Edible beef blood and blood products.
    17. Edible pork blood and blood products.
  2. Ineligible Meat Product
    1. Sheep, goat, bison, and buffalo products are subject to restrictions (see section A. Eligible Product).
    2. Veal and veal products derived from calves that received hormonal growth promotants regardless of whether the calf is non-ruminating or ruminating.
    3. The importation of the following meat products are prohibited:
      1. Meat products that contain spleens, lungs, udders, mucous membranes, or parotid salivary glands.
      2. Product with freezer burns or areas of dehydration.
      3. Artificially colored product.
      4. Meat inspected or identified under the following:
        1. Identification Service.
        2. Certification Service.
        3. Food Inspection Service.
        4. Reindeer Inspection Service.
      5. Meat products that have been subjected to water hyperchlorinated above 20 ppm. Exceptions: edible fat: lard, and tallow, livers previously removed from dressed carcasses that have been exposed to hyperchlorinated water and inedible meat products.

        Note: Equipment that contacts meat may be sanitized with up to 200 ppm chlorine if the surface is rinsed or is allowed to drain.
      6. Pork casings originating in the United States and processed in countries other than China are ineligible for export to Canada (see A.5.b.)
      7. Any meat products containing meat or a meat by-product derived from a calf (veal) of less than one (1) week old.
      8. Boneless ham products or whole muscle beef products containing injected ground or emulsified trimmings.
      9. Non-amenable species that are not slaughtered and processed under federal meat inspection.
    4. The use of partially defatted meats, such as beef and pork is not permitted in ground meat being exported to Canada, because this product has been subjected to heat treatment during preparation and is not considered fresh. It can however, be used in cooked product.
    5. Edible and inedible product certified for export to Canada cannot be stored in or shipped from a non-FSIS inspected facility.
    6. Ground meat from core samples taken from boxes of trim for subsequent analysis is not permitted entry to Canada.
    7. Irradiated meat products cannot be exported to Canada.
    8. Product treated by gaseous or aqueous application of ozone as an anti-microbial agent.
    9. Product treated with anhydrous ammonia as an anti-microbial agent.
    10. Effective April 27, 2010, rabbit meat and its byproducts from the State of Minnesota.

Note: CFIA is extending the expiration date for letters of exemption for imported food containing less than 2% meat product to November 30, 2013.

CFIA is extending the expiration date for letters of exemption for imported food containing more than 2% meat product to September 30, 2014.

Imported products containing more than 2% meat product for which importers do not have a letter of exemption will be required to comply with the Canadian Meat Inspection Regulations. The exemption applies only to section 9 of the Canadian Meat Inspection Act (MIA) as it pertains to foods containing more than 2% meat product in the form of concentrates and flavors.

Slaughter Requirements

  1. Meat: Fresh/Frozen.
    1. An AMS EV program is no longer required for export of beef and beef products to Canada.
    2. Hearts.
      1. Remove the aorta and other major blood vessels to within 2 cm of their origin.
      2. Auricles need not be trimmed except to permit removal of the major blood vessels.


Processing Requirements

  1. Meat
    1. Retained Water
      1. No meat species, including wholesale/primal cuts (includes rabbits) that retain water as a result of slaughter, dressing and chilling may be certified for export to Canada.
      2. Parts (hearts, head meat, cheek meat, diaphragms, tails) and organs (livers, kidneys) harvested during evisceration/dressing of carcasses and chilled by immersion in chilled water may retain added water only to the extent that is an unavoidable consequence of the process used to meet applicable food safety requirements. Up to 8 percent retained water is allowed.
      3. See Labeling Requirements (B.1.e).
    2. Added Substances.
      1. Nitrates, nitrites.
        1. In the curing of meat products other than side bacon, the maximum input level of sodium nitrite salts is 200 ppm. No nitrate allowed.
        2. In the curing of side bacon (bellies), the maximum input level of sodium nitrite salts is 120 ppm. No nitrate allowed.
        3. In the production of slow cured meat products, sodium nitrate salt at a maximum input level of 200 ppm, may be used in addition to the nitrite salts (200 ppm).
        4. For nitrate/nitrite residual test levels, follow-up actions are required if:
          • the analysis of the raw product shows a total level of nitrate/nitrite (sum of the nitrate and nitrite levels) exceeding 200 ppm.
          • the finished product shows an unusually elevated level of nitrate/nitrite (over 70 ppm).
        5. As follow-up actions, the company's formulation activities and related controls must be reviewed as well as the status of the company's HACCP plan for nitrite. A re-sampling must be done to confirm that the product is in compliance.
      2. The use of sorbates in beef jerky is prohibited.
      3. Sausage.
        1. Antioxidants are prohibited.
        2. Soya and other extenders are permitted, but products containing them must be labeled as extended meat products.
        3. Extenders must be nutritionally equivalent to the meat they replace, must meet all of the requirements of the Canadian Food and Drug Regulations, and must be approved by the Canadian Meat Inspection Division. Exporters may contact the Division for details.
      4. Dry and semi-dry sausage - Dry and semi-dry sausage manufacture must comply with one of the options specified in the following document which is found in Chapter 4, Annex K of the "Canadian Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures": Option used for the control of E. coli O157:H7 in Dry and Semi-dry fermented sausage.



 Labeling Requirements

  1. General Labeling Requirements
    1. Effective May 1, 2013, label pre-registration has been discontinued by CFIA. Exporters are advised that certain label applications need to be submitted to FSIS Labeling and Program Delivery Staff (LPDS) for approval. Labeling deviations from domestic requirements need to comply with 9 CFR 317.7 for meat and 381.128 for poultry. Deviations are permitted under these regulations but supporting documentation verifying foreign government acceptance of the labeling deviation need to be submitted along with the label approval. For additional information contact the Labeling and Program Delivery Staff at 1-800-233-3935.

      Labels for bulk packages (cartons) of fresh single ingredient products that do not contain special claims but must bear the Canadian mandatory label requirements. The main panel must be an intact section and not a combination made by uniting two or more sections during carton assembly.
      1. Descriptive terms applied to meat and poultry product must be consistent with Canadian Food and Drug Regulations and the Canadian Meat Inspection Regulations. Common names of meat and poultry products for sale in Canadian commerce are specified by the Uniform Meat Cut Nomenclature System (UMCNS) and are posted in the CFIA Meat Cuts Manual at the following web link: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/fssa/labeti/mcmancv/mcmancve.shtml.

      2. Canadian mandatory label requirements. The following information must appear on all meat and poultry labels:
        1. The name of the product. Common names of meat and poultry products must observe terminology found in the Uniform Meat Cut Nomenclature System (UMCNS) manual.
        2. The country of origin.
          1. The lettering "Product of USA" should be on the main label close to the product description.
          2. The lettering must be at least half the height of the largest letter on the main panel.

          Note: Mixed origin labeling (e.g. "Product of U.S., Canada, or Mexico") on product exported to Canada is not allowed. Imported meat is prohibited unless processed in the U.S.
        3. The net quantity of the product.
          1. Net weight declaration.
            • "Net Weight", "Net" and "Net Wt," are all allowed abbreviations to be used on the label. It is also permissible to indicate the numerical units in metric and avoirdupois units without preceding words.
            • Net weight must be declared in metric units. Dual net weights, in metric and avoirdupois, are acceptable. Associated unit weight symbols (g, kg, lb, oz), as applicable, must be in lower case letters without punctuation and without the plural "s", as shown.
          2. Net weight statement.
            • Labels for products of various weights (catch weights), e.g., beef cuts, hams, turkeys, chickens, must bear a net weight statement. Exporter may ship catch weight products; however, without marking the actual weight in the net weight statement on individual packages. The net weight figures may be added at the time of weighing and pricing in Canada.
            • Shipping containers containing catch weight products must show a net weight declaration and a net weight statement when shipped.
            • The words "net weight" is not necessary on a fixed net quantity statement.
        4. The list of ingredients.
        5. The name and address of the firm.
          1. The complete name and address--including the name of the country - of the manufacturer or first dealer must be shown.
          2. The first dealer must be a FSIS inspected plant or a Canadian distributor.
          3. The name of the first dealer must be preceded by the words " Prepared for".
          4. Multi-establishment firms may show the address of the central office instead of individual plants preparing the product.
        6. The USDA official inspection legend.
        7. The storage instructions.
          1. All products that are not shelf stable must provide storage information, e.g., " Keep refrigerated" or " Keep under refrigeration" if chilled product, or " Keep frozen" if frozen product, as applicable. Product labeled " Keep refrigerated" must not be frozen.
          2. A container labeled both " Keep refrigerated" and " Keep frozen" is not permitted by Canada.
          3. The storage instruction may be in the check-off form on a shipping container.
        8. Production date or production code.
      3. Prepackaged product (consumer-size packages).
        1. Immediate containers. Labels of all consumer-size packages of meat and poultry product must show:
          1. All mandatory label requirements on the main panel.
          2. The product name, ingredients statement, and net weight in English and French.
          3. A " Best Before Date" must be indicated where product has shelf life of less than 90 days at the time of packaging and labeling. Prepackaged product subsequently packaged under "modified atmosphere" need not have a " Best Before Date" applied at the time of packaging.
        2. Shipping containers. It will be the packers responsibility to ensure that the containers bear all mandatory label requirements, i.e.:
          1. The product name that is identical to the marking of the inner containers.
          2. The country of origin (Product of USA) must appear immediately below the product description. The lettering must be at least half the height of the largest letter on the main panel.
          3. The net quantity of the meat.
          4. The packer's name and address, including country.
          5. The USDA official inspection legend.
          6. The storage instructions, e.g., " Keep Refrigerated" or " Keep Frozen" for chilled and frozen product, respectively. Shipping containers are exempt from the bilingual labeling requirements even if the marking of the immediate container is in both official languages.
      4. Ready-to-Eat product. If any meat product is not a ready-to-eat meat product but has the appearance of or could be mistaken for a ready-to-eat meat product, the meat product shall bear the following information on its label:
        1. The words "must be cooked", "raw product", "uncooked", or any equivalent words or word as part of the common name of the product to indicate that the product requires cooking before consumption; and
        2. Comprehensive cooking instructions such as an internal temperature-time relationship that, if followed, will result in a ready-to-eat meat product.
      5. Labeling sealed product (vacuum packed). Sealed packaged primal and subprimal cuts or poultry carcasses and parts shipped in fully labeled outside containers must be marked or labeled by one of the following methods:
        1. Product individually marked with the USDA inspection legend. Frequently, frozen individually stamped product is not easily identifiable inside the package and may therefore be subject to rejection. To ensure ease of identification of product origin, it is recommended that bag closure and identification be one of the following:
          1. Heat sealed and the bag imprinted with the EST. number, e.g., "Est. 38."
          2. Closed by a clip bearing the Est/Plant number.
        2. Product not individually marked with the USDA inspection legend but packaged in:
          1. Printed sealed bags bearing all mandatory labeling information.
          2. Plain sealed bags with insert labels bearing all mandatory labeling information.
          3. Plain sealed bags with self-destructive pressure-sensitive labels applied that bear all mandatory labeling information. (Self-destructive labels are those that, once applied to the container, cannot be removed intact).
      6. Labeling of Canned Products.
        1. Canned products with lithographed labels which exhibit the country of production and establishment number must have the production date permanently marked on the body of the can. If only the country of production appears on the label, then the establishment number must be permanently marked on the body of the can as well.
        2. Canned products with removable labels must have the name of the country of origin (or an internationally recognized code), the establishment number, the code for the production date, and type of product permanently marked on the body of the can.
      7. Labeling of Blade and Needle Tenderized Beef
        1. In addition to the general labeling requirements, blade and needle tenderized beef products produced on and after July 1, 2013, intended to be sold at retail or to hospitals, restaurants and institutions must be identified as "mechanically tenderized" on the label. Instructions to cook to an internal temperature of at least 63 °C (145°F) must also be provided on the label. Any other cooking instruction will require approval from Health Canada.*
      8. Labeling of shipping containers.
        1. All or part of the mandatory information may be pre-printed on or applied to a shipping container by means of a self-destructive pressure-sensitive label or applied by on-line printing. (Self-destructive labels are those that, once applied to the container, cannot be removed intact).
          1. The weight may be handwritten.
          2. The use of a check-off system or stamping or stenciling of the product name is permitted.
        2. Placement of labels on containers.
          1. The label must be applied horizontally on the main panel.
            • The upper right hand corner is the main panel on a square or rectangle combo bin.
            • The label must be applied in close proximity to the top of a round combo bin.
          2. Size of label
            • The label of a small shipping carton must be of a size so that the information can be easily read.
        3. Though not recommended, shipping containers with hand holds may be used for product destined to Canada, provided the product is wrapped with a protective covering, with no exposed meat showing.
      9. Canadian disposition of product for shipping container labeling or USDA export stamp non-compliance.
        1. The broker/importer or representative may sort rejected lots by removing all non-complying containers; or correcting any labeling deficiency, except for the export stamp, by relabeling, stenciling, or obliterating the incorrect markings on all non-complying containers.
        2. Shipping containers on which the export stamps are missing, incorrect, or are completely illegible will be permitted entry provided an official of the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) affixes the export stamp to these containers. The marking of these containers must be under the supervision of a CFIA inspector in an establishment registered for inspection of imported meat products.

          Shipping containers with export stamps partially legible will be permitted entry providing the identifying characters are identical to complete export stamps of other containers in the lot.
        3. Lots rejected for export stamp or shipping carton labeling deficiencies may be re-offered for reinspection provided all non-complying containers are removed or corrected. In the case of partial shipments, the complying portion of the shipment can enter using the original FSIS Form 9135-3, whereas the sorted, non-complying part of the shipment may be accepted, following correction of the deficiencies and on the basis of a replacement certificate.

          Entire shipments that are rejected can be re-certified when the deficiencies are corrected. The Canadian inspector will select the appropriate sampling plan and reinspect the lot.

          Note: The CFIA (inspector at the reinspection establishment) must be notified of shipments of labeling to be used for relabeling. Failure to notify CFIA will result in seizure of the labeling.
      10. The Quebec requirement. A Quebec provincial "Order-in-Council", dated April 15, 1967, requires that labels of products marketed as consumer ready units in the Province of Quebec be written in the French language. Though not required, it is recommended that food service products for Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutions (HRI) trade be labeled in this manner as well. Bilingual labeling is permitted, but wording in French must precede that of the second language. The Order requires that food labels show:
        1. Product nature, composition, use, exact quantity, origin, etc.
        2. Name and address of manufacturer, preparer, conditioner, or processor.
        3. Country of origin.
      11. If U.S. product is exported to Canada for re-export to another country, all Canadian labeling requirements must be met unless the product is transported under bond to the port. Exporters are advised to determine that transport through Canada is not in conflict with the receiving country's requirements.
    2. Specific Labeling Requirements
      1. Meat Products. General labeling requirements are applicable; however,
        1. Calf/veal labels. Canada generally requires the word " veal" with the product name instead of "calf". Exceptions: calf brain, calf heart, calf liver, calf sweetbread.
        2. " Boneless" or " bone-in" must precede the name of the species of meat, either alone or as a generic name (Example: Boneless Beef) or it may be followed by the name of a cut acceptable in Canada (Example: Boneless Beef Sirloin Tips).

          This requirement applies only to the labeling of shipping or bulk containers of single ingredient meat cuts. Any deboned meat products must bear the wording "boneless" on the label as per Canadian requirements. However, if the product is boneless by nature (it was never deboned) it is not mandatory to describe it as boneless on the product label.*
        3. Grade status of beef cuts, carcasses destined for Canada.
          1. The label must include, in association with the product description, the U.S. grade status or " ungraded",
          2. Product within a box may consist of multiple grades, container markings may include the list of grades involved or a declaration such as "or higher" in conjunction with the USDA grade, and
          3. Graded and ungraded products cannot be mixed within the same box.
        4. Ground beef labeled as regular, medium, lean or extra lean may not exceed 30%, 23%, 17%, 10%, respectively, maximum fat content. Fat content percentages do not have to be declared on the label.
        5. Parts (hearts, head meat, cheek meat, diaphragms, tails) and organs (livers, kidneys) harvested during evisceration/dressing of carcasses and chilled by immersion in chilled water may retain added water only to the extent that is an unavoidable consequence of the process used to meet applicable food safety requirements. Up to 8 percent retained water is allowed.
          1. Parts and organs must declare the percent retained water in labeling. Moisture pick up can not exceed 8 percent.
          2. Zero moisture pick up for meat carcasses and primal cuts may be declared in labeling provided that moisture pick up is less than 0.5 percent.
        6. Boar labeling
          1. Fresh meat derived from boars and known cryptorchid pigs with a dressed carcass weight (head included) of less than 90 kg (198 lbs) must be identified with the word “Boar” after the product description on the product label if the meat is intended for shipment to a Canadian official establishment. This identification is not necessary if the meat is directly entering retail channels.
          2. Fresh meat derived from boars and known cryptorchid pigs with a dressed carcass weight (head included) over 90 kg (198 lb) must be identified with the word “Boar” as part of the product description on the product label.
      2. Casings. Casings must either bear the mark of inspection as indicated in FSIS Directive 9000.2, Inspection and Export Certification of Livestock Intestines or Casings, or must be sealed with an official USDA seal applied to the transport vehicle or to individual barrels when exported to Canada. Tamper evident tape stamped with the USDA export stamp is an acceptable alternative to an official USDA seal. The tape must be applied in a manner that prevents the product container from being opened without tearing the tape. The product description must reflect that the casings are salted (i.e. Beef Casings, Salt Added or Salted Beef Casings).
      3. With respect to meat and meat products of U.S. origin for just in time direct delivery to cruise ships anchored in Canadian ports, the meat products will enter Canada under Canadian Customs bond and will continue directly to cruise ships anchored in the CFIA designated cruise ship terminal in Canadian ports, to be used as food for passengers and/or crew. These products must be accompanied by the original copy of the FSIS Form 9135-3. See Section E. in Documentation for the certification requirements.



Marking of Product (Includes "For Further Processing")

  1. Marking Requirement. The USDA official inspection legend must be applied to inspected and passed meat product unless handled in accordance with section C. below.
  2. Product Impracticable to Stamp.
    1. Small organs, e.g., lamb or pork tongues, pork tails, kidneys, etc., or subprimal cuts for which individual stamping is considered impracticable are exempt from the marking requirements. They must, however, comply with one of the following packaging procedures:
      1. Product may be packaged in fully labeled consumer-size packages.
      2. Product may be packaged in bulk containers. Labels for these containers must bear all mandatory labeling requirements.
      3. Product may be shipped as unmarked product, and if so, must meet the requirements for shipping "unmarked" product.
  3. Shipment of Unmarked and Unstamped Product (includes raw and further processed products)
    1. Definitions:
      1. Unmarked meat products - products do not bear the meat inspection legend directly and they are packaged in non-labeled or partially labeled containers (i.e., they are missing all or part of the information in A.2. under Labeling Requirements above)
      2. Unstamped meat products - pieces, cuts, or other individual units that do not bear the USDA inspection legend but are packaged in a fully labeled shipping container (bears all mandatory information on the outside of the shipping container - see A.2. under Labeling Requirements above).

        The following packaging/labeling procedures will exempt product from sealing requirements and notation of "unstamped" on the export document even though the inspection legend is not found directly on the product:
        1. If the USDA legend is stamped on a sealed bag enclosing the product or applied to a breast tag on the product, it is not considered "unstamped."
        2. If an acceptable "tamper evident seal" method is used:
          • use of tape bearing the USDA inspection legend closed in such a way that the container cannot be opened without breaking the seal;
          • use of a strap bearing the company name such that the strap would have to be cut to open the container;
          • use of combo bins with a liner that can be sealed with a company seal bearing the name of the company such that the plastic strap or metal seal cannot be removed without breaking the seal or tearing the bag;
          • closing by means of a pressure sensitive label which doubles as a "tamper evident seal" which displays either the USDA inspection legend or a full label with all mandatory requirements.
          • "shrink wrapping" containers then applying a full pressure sensitive label with all mandatory requirements on the outside.

            "Unstamped" is not related in any way with presence or absence of the export stamp.
    2. Requirements for sealing shipping containers, trucks, or other types of containers conveying product to Canada
      1. "Unmarked" meat products may be imported into Canada provided:
        1. these products are consigned only to a Canadian registered establishment for further processing;
        2. they enter in a truck or other conveyance that is sealed with a USDA seal;
        3. the seal number is recorded on the FSIS Form 9135-3 (Meat and Poultry Export Certificate of Wholesomeness for Canada); and
        4. the product description on the certificate is preceded by the word " UNMARKED"; for example: " unmarked boneless ham". It is not necessary to have the word "UNMARKED" between parentheses or quotations nor is it necessary to have it as part of the product label. CFIA requires the use of the term "UNMARKED" as part of the certificate.
      2. "Unstamped" meat products may be imported into Canada sealed in one of the following ways:
        1. The truck or conveyance (e.g., lined combo bin) may be sealed by a commercial seal and the seal number is recorded in the “Remarks” section of FSIS 9135-3. The product description on FSIS Form 9135-3 must also be preceded by the word “Unstamped”. It is not necessary to have the word "UNSTAMPED" between parentheses or quotations nor is it necessary to have it as part of the product label. CFIA requires the use of the term "UNSTAMPED" as part of the certificate.
    3. Fully labeled meat products, stamped cuts, or unstamped cuts in fully labeled, sealed bags which are packaged in fully labeled shipping containers do not require a seal on the truck/conveyance.
  4. Shipment of pork meat certified free of Trichinella spiralis

    When shipping pork meat certified free of Trichinella spiralis to Canada, the exporters must ensure that boxed products are stamped "Frozen for the control of Trichinella" on the main panel of each box.
  5. Multiple marks of inspection.

    The application of multiple marks of inspection on a single shipping container is not acceptable.


Documentation Requirements

  1. Certification Requirements for meat products:
    1. The CFIA has removed the requirement for pre-clearance of the FSIS Form 9135-3, Certificate for Export of Meat and Poultry Products to Canada. This also applies to FSIS Form 9060-7 and FSIS Form 9060-18 issued for natural casings. As of February 17, 2014 the CFIA no longer processes pre-clearance review requests of export certificates or documentation.

      Details outlining the implementation dates assigned to specific Canadian importers and brokers is available. Effective the date assigned to each Canadian importer and broker the original completed and signed export certificate must be provided directly to the broker. Since the CFIA no longer pre-clears export certificates for accuracy and completeness the exporters must ensure that all data requirements are entered accurately and completely onto the FSIS Form 9135-3, FSIS Form 9060-7, FSIS Form 9060-18, and FSIS letterhead certificates. Failure to provide accurate and complete information could result in delayed, or refused, entry of the U.S. products exported to Canada. A guideline for completing export certificates for Canada is available.

      Canadian importers and brokers currently enter the import data requirements available on the export certificate into the Canadian Border Services Agency’s (CBSA’s) Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) system. The data requirements must be accurate and complete to ensure the import requirements are met to allow entry into Canada. Exporters are encouraged to work closely with their Canadian importers and brokers to prevent any potential disruption to shipments to Canada.

      Note: FSIS Form 9135-3, Certificate for Export of Meat and Poultry Products to Canada, is reprinted annually with a version corresponding to the current year (e.g., US-CA-2014). The new version becomes available in December of each year. The previous year version may be used until February 28 of the following year.
    2. All export certificates accompanying product must be signed by an FSIS veterinarian. The veterinary degree (DVM or equivalent) and the District/Circuit code must be indicated after the signature.
    3. Fresh/frozen and processed products: Obtain FSIS Form 9135-3--Certificate for Export of Meat and Poultry Products to Canada.
      1. Required information on export certificates to be included for each product label/Est. #:
        1. Complete and accurate product name (if applicable, include the volume of the individual container).
        2. Weight of lot.
        3. Number and type of containers in the lot (for canned product, indicate the volume of individual containers together with the number of containers within the shipping carton on the export certificate, example: (860 ml x 12)).
      2. The product description on the export certificate must be the same as that:
        1. Printed on the shipping containers.
    4. Export certificate continuation sheets. Obtain FSIS Form 9135-3A when a continuation sheet is required to complete itemization of products in the shipment because of insufficient space on the FSIS Form 9135-3. Type the following statement in the "Remarks" section of FSIS Form 9135-3: " Continuation sheet attached." Do not use company letterhead or USDA/FSIS letterhead stationery.
    5. "In lieu of" Certificates. Replacement certificates issued in accordance with FSIS Directive 9000.1, Revision 1 (3/1/06) should reflect the following statement in the "Remarks" section, rather than in the left margin: " Issued in lieu of Certificate No. _____. The export mark on the product covered by this certificate shows Certificate No. _____." This is advised because the margin is often cut off when faxed to the Import Control Office in Ottawa.
    6. The export stamp. The export stamp showing the certificate number must be applied to the main panel of each shipping carton. Do NOT apply the export stamp to the export certificate.
    7. For all meat and meat products derived from animals of the sub-family Bovinae (cattle, buffalo, bison), including veal, derived from animals slaughtered in the United States, the following statement should be provided in the Remarks section of FSIS Form 9135-3 or on an FSIS letterhead certificate.
      1. "This is to certify that the meat products covered by this certificate:
        • were derived from animals which were not subjected to a stunning process in which a device is used to inject compressed air or gas into the animal's cranial cavity, or to a pithing process involving laceration, after stunning of the animal, of the animal's central nervous tissue by means of an elongated rod-shaped instrument that is introduced into the animal's cranial cavity and which were subject to ante-mortem and post-mortem inspections and were not suspect or confirmed BSE cases and,
        • do not contain the following risk material: skull, brain, trigeminal ganglia, eyes, spinal cord, dorsal root ganglia, vertebral column, excluding the vertebrae of the tail, the transverse processes of the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae, and the wings of the sacrum, from bovine animals aged 30 months and older, and tonsils from bovine animals of all ages, and the distal ileum of the small intestine from bovine animals of all ages, from the ileo-cecal junction and a minimum of 200 cm (80 inches) of the attached and uncoiled small intestine proximal to the ileo-cecal junction; the removal of the distal ileum was done under an FSIS verified program, and
        • do not contain mechanically separated meat from the skull and vertebral column from bovine animals aged 30 months or older."

        Note: Canada's requirements related to the distal ileum are now consistent with U.S. requirements

        Note: Bison and buffalo products must be produced under an approved AMS, EV program in order to be eligible for export to Canada.
    8. For meat and meat products derived from sheep and goats less than 12 months of age, if the slaughter establishment and all subsequent processing establishments are on an AMS list of approved establishments verifying eligibility of the plant to export such product to Canada, and the export applicant certifies that the product meets an export verification program for Canada, then the following statement should be provided in the Remarks section of FSIS Form 9135-3 or on an FSIS letterhead certificate:

      “The meat product covered by this certificate was derived from/contains meat product from animals that were under 12 months of age when slaughtered.”

      The list of AMS approved U.S. establishments can be found at AMS' Web site.
    9. Imported meat and meat products derived from animals of the sub-family Bovinae (cattle, buffalo, bison), and sheep and goats, processed or packaged and labeled in U.S. establishments, must have the following certification statement in the Remarks section of FSIS Form 9135-3 or on an FSIS Letterhead Certificate. Eligibility by product and country is shown in Eligible Products, 4. Cross out the countries listed in the certification statement that did not originate the meat in the shipment.

      "Meat products containing meat derived from animals of the sub-family Bovinae (cattle, buffalo, bison), and sheep and goats, covered by this certificate contain meat derived from animals of the sub-family Bovinae (cattle, buffalo, bison), and sheep and goats, that were legally imported into the United States from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, New Zealand or Uruguay (delete as appropriate) only."
    10. Beef jerky produced in Brazil and/or Argentina and packaged and labeled in the United States must have the following certification statement in the Remarks section of FSIS Form 9135-3 or on an FSIS Letterhead Certificate:

      "Beef jerky covered by this certificate was imported from Brazil or Argentina (delete as appropriate), under Official Meat Inspection Certificate Number _______(a copy is attached) and complies with the conditions specified in the CFIA Animal Health Import Permit Number __________."

      Note: The U.S. exporter must provide a copy of the official certificate issued by Brazil or Argentina and a copy of the CFIA animal health import permit.
    11. For edible blood, edible blood fractions (e.g., plasma, clotting factors, cells) and edible meat products containing blood and/or blood fractions (e.g., sausages, blood pudding) derived from beef and farmed bison slaughtered in the United States, the following statement must be provided in the Remarks section of FSIS Form 9135-3 or on an FSIS letterhead certificate:

      The blood and blood products covered by this certificate:
      1. were derived from animals which were not subjected to a stunning process in which a device is used to inject compressed air or gas into the animal’s cranial cavity, or to a pithing process involving laceration, after stunning of the animal, of the animal’s central nervous tissue by means of an elongated rod-shaped instrument that is introduced into the animal’s cranial cavity
      2. were derived from animals which were subject to and passed ante-mortem and post-mortem inspections; and were not suspect or confirmed BSE cases, AND
      3. the blood was collected from bovine animals using a closed blood collection method.
    12. For edible blood, edible blood fractions (e.g., plasma, clotting factors, cells),  and edible meat products containing blood and/or blood fractions (e.g., sausages, blood pudding) derived from pork slaughtered in the United States, the following statement must be provided in the Remarks section of FSIS Form 9135-3 or on an FSIS letterhead certificate:

      The blood was collected from porcine animals using a closed blood collection method.
    13. Natural Casings
      1. Casings derived from livestock slaughtered under inspection in the United States:
        1. Obtain FSIS Form 9060-7 (08/26/2011), Animal Casings Export Certificate for Countries Requiring Ante-mortem, Post-mortem and Fit for Human Food Statements.
        2. For bovine casings, in addition to FSIS Form 9060-7, obtain an FSIS Letterhead Certificate for the Export of Natural Bovine Casings to Canada Derived from Animals Slaughtered in the United States.
        3. For ovine casings, in addition to FSIS Form 9060-7, obtain an FSIS Letterhead Certificate for the Export of Natural Ovine Casings to Canada Derived from Animals Slaughtered in the United States.
        4. For porcine casings, in addition to FSIS Form 9060-7, obtain an FSIS Letterhead Certificate for the Export of Natural Porcine Casings to Canada.
      2. Casings derived from livestock slaughtered in one of the eligible countries and imported into the United States:
        1. Obtain FSIS Form 9060-18 (08/25/2011), Animal Casings Export Certificate for Countries Requiring Ante-mortem, Post-mortem and Sound and Clean Statements
        2. For bovine casings, in addition to FSIS Form 9060-18, obtain an FSIS Letterhead Certificate for the Export of Natural Bovine Casings to Canada Derived from Casings Imported into the United States. Cross out the countries listed in the certification statement on this certificate that did not originate the casings in the shipment.
        3. For ovine casings, in addition to FSIS Form 9060-18, obtain an FSIS Letterhead Certificate for the Export of Natural Ovine Casings to Canada Derived from Casings Imported into the United States. Cross out the countries listed in the certification statement on this certificate that did not originate the casings in the shipment.
        4. For porcine casings, in addition to FSIS Form 9060-18, obtain an FSIS Letterhead Certificate for the Export of Natural Porcine Casings to Canada.
      3. Casings not eligible for the mark of inspection must be sealed with an official USDA seal applied to the transport vehicle or to individual barrels. The seal number(s) must be recorded on the FSIS letterhead certificate. Tamper evident tape stamped with the USDA export stamp bearing the export certificate number is an acceptable alternative to an official USDA seal. The tape must be applied in a manner that prevents the product container from being opened without tearing the tape. Containers with broken or loose tape will be refused entry.
      4. At the time of signature, casings certificates and any accompanying letterhead certificates must be stamped with the FSIS rubber export stamp indicating the certificate number or replacement certificate number if a replacement certificate is issued.
    14. Rabbit meat and rabbit meat products. For other than commercially sterile, shelf stable rabbit meat products in hermetically sealed containers and shelf stable and dried soup mix products, bouillon cubes and meat extract made with rabbit meat, the following certification statement must appear in the Remarks section of FSIS Form 9135-3:

      “The meat products covered by this certificate are derived from rabbits which have not been in the U.S. states of Indiana or Kentucky. Every precaution was taken to prevent direct or indirect contact during the slaughter, processing and packaging of the meat with any animal product or by-product derived from animals of a lesser zoosanitary status.”
    15. U.S. Imported Meat and Poultry Product. Meat and poultry product imported from foreign countries into the United States is eligible for export to Canada provided the following conditions are met:
      1. Product that has been further processed in the United States is accompanied by U.S. export certificate when exported to Canada.
      2. Product that has not been further processed in the United States (transiting U.S. only) is accompanied by the origin country certificates consigned to a consignee in Canada.
  2. Pharmaceutical Requirements
    1. Export certification of inedible products, other than technical animal fat (9 CFR 351) and certified pet food (9 CFR 355), is no longer provided by FSIS. Exporters should contact APHIS field offices to obtain information about certification of inedible products. A list of APHIS offices is available at APHIS' Web site.
    2. Obtain FSIS Form 9205-7 (7/88), Certificate for Glands, Organs, and Offal for Pharmaceutical Purposes only if the product bears the U.S. mark of inspection.
  3. Waiver of Canadian Requirements
    1. The following statement must appear in the "remarks" section of FSIS Form 9135-3 if the company has been granted a waiver to Canadian labeling requirements:

      "The Canadian requirements for meat product composition and labeling have been waived for the product listed above because it will be processed in Canada and exported to the U.S. or other countries."
    2. The product must be identified as " unmarked", which requires a USDA seal on the truck.
  4. Meat exported to Canada for further processing and subsequently exported to Japan - Upon the request of the exporter, the following information must be provided either in the "Remarks" section of FSIS Form 9135-3 or on an FSIS Letterhead Certificate (which is signed by the same FSIS veterinarian signing the export certificate):
    1. Statements for products intended for re-export to Japan:

      "The meat and/or meat products described herein were processed under sanitary conditions in accordance with laws and regulations of the United States. The laws and regulations of the United States have been deemed to be equivalent to the inspection laws of Japan."

      For pork only, also include the following statement:

      "The USA is free of hog cholera; vaccination against hog cholera is prohibited; and importation of pigs vaccinated against hog cholera is prohibited."
    2. Name, address, and establishment number of the slaughter (If product is quarter, half, or whole carcass) or processing plant (if packaged product).
    3. "Date (Month/Year) of slaughter and inspection", if product is quarter, half, or whole carcass or "Date (Month/Year) of Manufacture" if cuts or processed products, i.e., Pack Date.

      Note: Listing of dates in the "Remarks" section of FSIS Form 9135-3 must be identified as shown above to be consistent with the term used on FSIS Form 9290-1.
  5. Pork meat exported to Canada for further processing and subsequently exported to Mexico - Upon the request of the exporter, provided that the slaughter and/or processing facility is listed on the FSIS Eligible Plant List for Mexico and the product itself is eligible for export to Mexico, the following information must be provided either in the "Remarks" section of FSIS Form 9135-3 or on an FSIS Letterhead Certificate:

    "The product originated from slaughter and/or processing establishments in the United States of America approved by the Mexican Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fish and Food (SAGARPA). The facilities where product originates are listed on the FSIS Eligible Plant List for Mexico."

    "The USA is free of Hog Cholera."
  6. Meat and meat products (except pork and pork products) exported to Canada for further processing and subsequently exported to Mexico - Upon the request of the exporter, provided that the slaughter and/or processing facility is listed on the FSIS Eligible Plants List for Mexico and the product itself is eligible for export to Mexico, the following information must be provided either in the "Remarks" section of FSIS Form 9135-3 or on an FSIS Letterhead Certificate:

    "The product originated from slaughter and/or processing establishments in the United States of America approved by the Mexican Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fish and Food (SAGARPA). The facilities where product originates are listed on the FSIS Eligible Plant List for Mexico."
  7. Meat and meat products of U.S. origin for just in time direct delivery to cruise ships anchored in designated cruise ship Canadian ports must have the following certification statement in the Remarks Section of FSIS Form 9135-3 or on an FSIS Letterhead Certificate:

    "The Canadian requirements for meat products composition and labeling have been waived. The meat products covered by this certificate are intended for direct and just in time delivery to cruise ships anchored in designated cruise ship facilities in Canadian ports."



Handling/Storage Requirements

  1. Combo Bins
    1. Only fresh meat cuts are permitted entry in combo bins. The use of combo bins for export of frozen meat cuts is prohibited. (Frozen cuts are permitted entry only in closed shipping containers bearing all mandatory labeling requirements.)
    2. Combo bins must be consigned directly to Canadian registered establishments.
    3. Combo bins must bear all mandatory labeling information for shipping containers (see labeling requirements.)
  2. Truckload or Carload Lots
    1. Placards. Loose or bulk meat and edible fats conveyed in railroad cars, trucks, or trailers must be accompanied by a placard (12"x12") that bears all mandatory labeling requirements. The placard must be affixed to the door of the vehicle containing meats and in a conspicuous location of the vehicle containing edible fats. Carload lots of shortening, lard, or tallow must be consigned directly to a Canadian registered establishment.
    2. Carcass identification.
      1. All meat carcasses, sides and quarters exported to Canada must be identified by one of the following three methods:
        1. Stamped with the meat inspection legend and identified with the certificate number (export stamp). The normal means of identification is by applying the export stamp onto a shipping tag
        2. Stamped with the meat inspection legend and the transport container (i.e.. truck, wagon, etc.) must be identified with the certificate number (export stamp) by means of a placard inside of the transport container and be sealed with an official USDA seal.
        3. If carcasses, sides or quarters are not individually stamped with the meat inspection legend, then the transport container must be identified by means of a placard bearing all mandatory labeling requirements including the certificate number (export stamp) placed inside the transport container, and must be sealed with an official USDA seal.
      2. All beef carcasses, sides, and quarters must be marked with the U.S. grade designation or will be treated as "ungraded" beef. The same grade designation stamped on the beef must appear on the shipping tag or placard. If the beef is not graded, then the shipping tag or placard must bear the words "ungraded". Mixed loads of graded/ungraded beef will be permitted provided the shipping tag/placard has the correct grading information indicated.
  3. The use of carbon monoxide (CO) in Modified Atmospheric Packaging (MAP) is allowed up to 0.4% CO of suitable food grade quality when used in an outer barrier bag containing a packaged retail meat cut, but not when it is in direct contact with fresh meat.
  4. Repackaging of Imported Product Prior to Export to Canada
    1. The repackaging of imported product prior to export to Canada from a foreign plant's boxes to U.S. plant's boxes is permitted provided that the product is further processed during the repackaging procedure.
    2. Repackaging of imported product without further processing of the product is prohibited. Switching product from one vacuum pack to another vacuum pack with a different establishment number is not considered further processing.
  5. Handling Inedible Product. Canada requires that:
    1. The chilling, packing, and marking of inedible meat products for animal food must be carried out in rooms or areas where meat product for human consumption is not handled.
    2. A meat product that is not approved for human food but is passed for animal food must be directed to and processed in a designated room of the inedible products area.
    3. Inedible meat products identified for animal food must be denatured prior to their export to Canada.



Inedible Product for Animal Food (See Meat and Poultry Requirements

  1. Inedible Product for Animal Food.
    1. Export certification of inedible products, other than technical animal fat (9 CFR 351) and certified pet food (9 CFR 355), is no longer provided by FSIS. Exporters should contact APHIS field offices to obtain information about certification of inedible products. A list of APHIS offices is available at APHIS' Web site.


Other Requirements

  1. Hyperchlorination of Water. Hyperchlorination is limited to not more than 20 ppm in contact with meat carcasses. Up to 200 ppm chlorine can be used on hard non-porous surfaces without rinse with potable water provided the surfaces are thoroughly drained.

    Note: Since hyperchlorination differences between the U.S. and Canada are minimal, the former need for routine, written verification (letters) from IIC's at slaughter and processing establishments that hyperchlorination requirements are met is left to the discretion of the FSIS veterinarian signing FSIS Form 9135-3. As indicated by FSIS Directive 9000.1, the applicant is confirming that the product meets Canadian requirements upon signing the Application for Export (FSIS Form 9060-6). Beyond that, if the certifying official needs further clarification, additional documentation may be requested which might include letters from the companies involved or if necessary, appropriate FSIS personnel.
  2. Organic acid carcass sprays
    1. Lactic, acetic, and citric acid pathogen reduction sprays applied according to U.S. regulatory requirements are allowed. Prior approval by the CFIA is not required.
  3. Beef carcasses that have been sprayed with water intermittently during chilling under a control program are eligible for export provided that there has been no increase in net weight of the carcasses as a result of the spraying.
  4. Canadian import inspectors must be able to view the export stamp and product labels on cartons/combos that are placed on the rear of the truck. It is advisable to position these cartons and/or combos at the time of loading in order to avoid any delays at the border.
    1. If the inspector is unable to verify the export stamp or the product labels, the company has three options:
      1. Have a carton/combo removed or turned around so the inspector can examine the shipping container at the border,
      2. move the product to the designated reinspection facility in Canada so the Canadian inspector can verify the information on the shipping container,
      3. or upon request of the U.S. exporter or the Canadian importer, move the product to any other Canadian reinspection facility that may be closer to the border for visual inspection by the Canadian inspector.
    2. Full reinspection of a shipment designated as a "skip lot" will only occur if there is a problem with the export stamp or shipping label.
  5. Return of USDA-Accepted Canadian Export Product
    1. Canadian export product that has passed U.S. import inspection. Meat and poultry exported to the United States from Canada becomes U.S. product after it has passed U.S. import inspection and has been released to the importer. To export this product back to Canada, the product must be certified for export under the usual USDA certification procedure. However, FSIS Form 9135-3 does not need to be submitted for preverification by the CFIA prior to shipping. The following statements must be typed in the "Remarks" section of FSIS Form 9135-3:
      1. " The product originated in Canada."
      2. " The product has been under USDA control for the duration of its stay in the United States."
    2. Immediate return of product. An exception to subparagraph 1. may be made if the shipment is returned immediately and is accompanied by all original export certificates. The product is ineligible for entry into Canada if not accompanied by the applicable certificates. Exporters may wish to contact Canadian regional inspection officials in the region in which the origin plant is located for advice on return of product on a case basis.
  6. Return of U.S. Product Rejected in Canada - Information about the procedures to return export products to the United States is available on the Export Products Returned to the United States page of the FSIS Web site.
  7. Personal consumption. Meat products, other than those derived from animals of the sub-family Bovinae (cattle, buffalo, bison), and sheep and goats, weighing 44lb (20 kg) or less intended for personal consumption of the traveler is permitted entry without export documentation. This includes product sold through mail order, which needs to identify the consumer on the packing slip or company letterhead and indicate that the product is not intended for resale. Meat products derived from animals of the sub-family Bovinae, and sheep and goats, weighing 11 lb (5 kg) or less intended for personal consumption of the traveler is permitted entry without export documentation.
  8. Sample/Research Product.
    1. Meat product, other than beef and beef products, weighing up to 220 lb (100 kg) intended for sample or research use and not for sale is permitted entry without export documentation provided that:
      1. A packing slip or letter is enclosed bearing the establishment, name, and address of the plant, product name and weight, and the statement: "Not for Sale."
      2. The outer carton is marked: " Sample - Not For Sale."
      3. The Canadian importer has provided declaration for entry of the sample.
    2. For additional assistance sending sample/research product into Canada, contact the appropriate regional office: Moncton, New Brunswick; (506) 851-7400: Montreal, Quebec, (514) 283-8888; Guelph, Ontario, (519) 837-9400; Winnipeg, Manitoba, (204) 983-4769; Calgary, Alberta, (403) 292-4364; Vancouver, British Columbia, (604) 666-0841.
    3. Beef and beef products weighing up to 220 lb (100 kg) intended for sample or research use and not for sale will be permitted entry but must comply with the same requirements as commercial shipments. However, these products are exempted from commercial shipment labeling requirements and FSIS Form 9135-3 does not have to be pre-cleared in Ottawa.
  9. Mechanically Separated Species.
    1. Compositional standards:
      1. The calcium content shall not exceed 0.027% for each one percent (1%) of protein.
      2. The maximum bone particle size shall not exceed 2 mm.
    2. Mechanically separated meat from meat origin must be declared as such in the ingredient statement on the label of further processed products.
  10. Sealing shipments of meat products exported from the U.S. into Canada.
    1. An official USDA seal is required for shipments of "unmarked" products; a commercial seal is acceptable for "unstamped" products (see definitions of these categories under the "Marking of Product" section).
    2. The following conditions must be met if a shipment must be resealed (or an additional seal must be applied) after the export certificate has been issued:
      1. Removal of the initial seal, unloading, loading, and resealing the vehicle must be done under the supervision of the USDA inspector.
      2. The USDA inspector must issue a letter on USDA letterhead with the following information: Identify the US-CA certificate number, the initial seal number, the replacement seal number and the reason why a replacement seal was needed.
    3. This letter should accompany the original certificate to the border. Do NOT add a second seal number to the certificate. Altering the certificate in any way invalidates the certificate, which will result in rejection at the border.
  11. Tray pack, club pack, or jacket pack product - Canned or other retail labeled product is sometimes shipped in trays or other minimally enclosed packing method which is equivalent to case packing except that it does not afford adequate surface area on which to apply a shipping label or the export stamp. Such product may be palletized, shrink-wrapped and shipped bearing one shipping label and one export stamp per pallet provided the following are met:
    1. each pallet must contain the same type of product,
    2. the shipping label to be placed on the pallet must bear all mandatory Canadian labeling requirements according to Labeling Section A.3.b. and must include the inspection legend and export stamp,
    3. retail units must be production coded and codes must be listed on FSIS Form 9135-3, Certificate for Export of Meat and Poultry Products, and
    4. the consignee listed on FSIS Form 9135-3 must be the point of sale for the product (after the shrink wrap is broken, tray packs may not move in commerce in Canada).

      When completing FSIS Form 9135-3 (center blocks), exporters must enter a description of the tray pack and product name, e.g., Luncheon Meat (3x 340g), the number of tray packs, club packs, etc., and net weight for each type of product (retail label).
  12. Guaranteed Replacement Certificates - Shipments of U.S. meat and poultry detained by CFIA inspectors for certain types of certification errors may be released based on the exporting firm's or their representative's guarantee that a replacement certificate will be provided. Before requesting a guarantee, it should be determined if a replacement certificate can be issued by FSIS. Following FSIS Directive 9000.1, the valid reasons for replacing a certificate are: the original certificate did not carry required information, the original certificate carried incorrect information, or the name of consignee or exporter has changed. Replacement certificates cannot be issued when net weight or case count of the shipment exceeds the net weight or case count shown on the certificate.

    The original certificate will be stamped "refused entry." The U.S. exporter (or Canadian importer) will have 2 working days to notify the CFIA import inspector that a replacement certificate will be issued and guaranteed. Procedures established to provide the guarantee and the replacement certificate must be followed.


Plants Eligible To Export

All federally inspected U.S. meat and poultry plants are recognized initially as eligible to export to Canada. FSIS Form 9080-3 is not needed.  However, exporters must make sure that their establishments are listed in the current FSIS Meat and Poultry Inspection Directory to prevent any delays in getting their certificates approved. Contact FSIS at (202) 720-0082 or (855) 444-9904, for assistance.


Plants Not Eligible To Export

Meat and poultry and meat and poultry products produced at the following establishments are not eligible for export to Canada until further notice. In addition, meat and poultry products produced at other establishments from material originating from these establishments are also not eligible for export to Canada.

Est 2646/P-2646, Johnston County Hams, Smithfield, NC. Effective for product produced on or after April 17, 2007.

Est 2041/P-657, H.J. Heinz Co., Muscatine, IA. Effective December 24, 2012 export certification should not be issued for product produced at this establishment.

Est. 34483, Mongiello Italian Cheese Special, 250 Hilldale Road, Hurleyville, NY. Effective October 31, 2013 export certification should not be issued for product produced at this establishment.

Est. 527, Rancho Feeding Corporation, 1522 Petaluma Blvd. North, Petaluma, CA. Effective February 17, 2014 export certification should not be issued for product produced at this establishment.


Poultry Export Requirements for Canada

Eligible/Ineligible Poultry Products 

  1. Eligible Product
    1. Federally inspected poultry and poultry products, with the exception of those poultry products indicated below in Section "B. Ineligible Product".
    2. Ground meat may be exported from the U.S. into Canada. There is no restriction on the weight of the containers. The type of ground meat, i.e.. regular, medium or lean, must be identified in the product description on the export certificate.
    3. Use of phosphate (TSP) as a pathogen reducing agent may be used for pre-chill or post-chill applications on raw poultry carcasses under certain conditions.
    4. Imported Poultry Product. Poultry product imported from foreign countries and further processed in the United States is eligible for export to Canada.
  2. Ineligible Product
    1. All carcasses and parts that contain kidneys and sexual organs, other than those of chickens under 2.7 kg (5.9 lb) live weight and young ducks under 4 kg live weight based on average weight.
    2. Mechanically separated poultry meat produced from raw material containing kidneys. Exception: Mechanically separated chicken and finely textured meat derived from chicken under 2.7 kg live weight is eligible if the presence of the kidneys is declared on the label.
    3. Boneless poultry products containing injected ground or emulsified trimmings.
    4. Irradiated poultry products cannot be exported to Canada.
    5. Product certified for export to Canada cannot be stored in or shipped from a non-USDA inspected facility including Identification Service, Certification Service, and Food Inspection Service.
    6. Non-amenable species that are not slaughtered and processed under federal meat inspection. This includes game meat imported under the control of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
    7. Product treated by gaseous or aqueous application of ozone as an anti-microbial agent.
    8. Head-on, feet-on carcasses. These carcasses can not comply with the Canadian requirement to bear the U.S. mark of inspection..

Note: CFIA is extending the expiration date for letters of exemption for imported food containing less than 2% meat product to November 30, 2013.

CFIA is extending the expiration date for letters of exemption for imported food containing more than 2% meat product to September 30, 2014.

Imported products containing more than 2% meat product for which importers do not have a letter of exemption will be required to comply with the Canadian Meat Inspection Regulations. The exemption applies only to section 9 of the Canadian Meat Inspection Act (MIA) as it pertains to foods containing more than 2% meat product in the form of concentrates and flavors.


Facility Requirements

  1. Sanitizers.
    1. The CFIA requires sanitizers in poultry plants that export directly or indirectly to Canada.
      1. Sanitizers are required for instruments, e.g., knives, scissors, and other instruments, that are used:
        1. At trim stations on the evisceration line.
        2. In boning rooms.
      2. Must be maintained at a minimum temperature of 180° F.
      3. Must have an adequate water overflow connected directly to a drain.

        Note: Chemical sanitizers can be substituted for 180° F water if their use is supported by manufacturers' documentation or by data made available to FSIS personnel such that the establishment can show that the chemical sanitizer is equivalent to the sanitizing effect of 180° F water. Go to AskFSIS for additional guidance on the use of chemical sanitizers, or contact the Import Export Coordination and Policy Development Staff at (202) 720-0082 or (855) 444-9904.

    2. Automatic equipment, e.g., eviscerators, may be sanitized between carcasses with chlorinated water not to exceed 50 ppm chlorine.
    3. Products to be exported to Canada must be sourced from slaughter facilities that meet the above facilities requirements regardless of whether or not the raw poultry products go through additional processing/lethality steps such as cooking.


Slaughter Requirements

Canada's humane slaughter laws, requiring the stunning of poultry before slaughter, apply not only to domestic plants but also to plants that export product to Canada. The only exceptions to this requirement are ritual slaughter of poultry and decapitation of poultry without prior electrical stunning where stunning would result in excessive bone breakage. See "Documentation Requirements."

Processing Requirements

  1. Poultry Products
    1. Procedures.
      1. Ready to cook, raw, single ingredient carcasses and cuts may not exceed moisture pick up as a result of washing, chilling or other contact with water in excess of that indicated in the Retained Water in Poultry Chart (below) for the kind (species) and weight of bird as indicated in Column II.
      2. For all kinds (species) NOT prepackaged, i.e., packed in ice, maximum weight increase shall not be more than four percent greater than that set out in Column II of the Retained Water in Poultry Chart for the kind (species) and weight of dressed poultry carcasses individually packaged. See Column III.

        Retained Water in Poultry Chart
        Kinds Column I - Weight of Dressed Poultry Carcass (individually packaged) Column II - Maximum Weight Increase Column III - All kinds NOT pre- packaged (bulk packed in ice)
        Turkeys Under 4.5 kg 8.0% 12%
        Turkeys 4.5 kg to under 9 kg 6.0% 10%
        Turkeys 9 kg and over 5.5% 9.5%
        Chickens Under 2.3 kg 8.0% 12.0%
        Chickens 2.3 kg and over 6.0% 10.0%
        All other kinds irrespective of weight 6.0% 10.0%
      3. See Specific Labeling Requirements B. 7., Labeling of retained water in Poultry.
    2. Added Substances.
      1. Phosphates.
        1. Baking soda containing the following phosphates is permitted in product produced for Canada:
          • For breading: Sodium acid pyro-phosphate; Mono calcium phosphate.
          • For batter: Sodium aluminum phosphate.
        2. Other types of phosphates must be approved by the Canadian Label Unit before use.
      2. Nitrates, nitrites.
        1. The input of nitrate/nitrite into raw or cooked product is permitted up to 200 ppm in combination.
        2. For nitrate/nitrite residual test levels, follow-up actions are required if:
          • the analysis of the raw product shows a total level of nitrate/nitrite (sum of the nitrate and nitrite levels) exceeding 200 ppm.
          • the finished product shows an unusually elevated level of nitrate/nitrite (over 70 ppm).
        3. As follow-up actions, the company's formulation activities and related controls must be reviewed as well as the status of the company's HACCP plan for nitrite. A re-sampling must be done to confirm that the product is in compliance.
      3. Sausage.
        1. Antioxidants are prohibited.
        2. Soya and other extenders are permitted, but products containing them must be labeled as extended meat products.
        3. Extenders must be nutritionally equivalent to the meat they replace, must meet all of the requirements of the Canadian Food and Drug Regulations, and must be approved by the Canadian Meat and Processed Animal Products Division. Exporters may contact the Division for details.
      4. Dry and semi-dry sausage - Dry and semi-dry sausage manufacture must comply with one of the options specified in the following document which is found in Chapter 4, Annex K of the "Canadian Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures": Option used for the control of E. coli O157:H7 in Dry and Semi-dry fermented sausage .
    3. Chicken fat is required to be bulk packed and identified as "for further processing". Once in Canada, such a product must be either further processed or packed and labeled as " Product of USA" in a Canadian registered establishment.
    4. Diced, cooked chicken meat must comply with the requirements for labeling, kidney removal.
    5. The standards for ground meat are as follows: Regular ground meat, maximum 30% fat; Medium ground meat, maximum 23% fat; Lean ground meat, 17% fat.


Labeling Requirements

  1. General Labeling Requirements
    1. Effective May 1, 2013, label pre-registration has been discontinued by CFIA. Registration numbers of previously reviewed and registered labels are no longer required on the export certificate. Exporters are advised that certain label applications need to be submitted to FSIS Labeling and Program Delivery Staff (LPDS) for approval. Labeling deviations from domestic requirements need to comply with 9 CFR 317.7 for meat and 381.128 for poultry. Deviations are permitted under these regulations but supporting documentation verifying foreign government acceptance of the labeling deviation need to be submitted along with the label approval. For additional information contact the Labeling and Program Delivery Staff at 1-800-233-3935.

      Labels for bulk packages (cartons) of non prepared products that do not contain special claims must bear the Canadian mandatory label requirements. The main panel must be an intact section and not a combination made by uniting two or more sections during carton assembly. If unstamped product is going directly to the consumer, the export certificate will have " UNSTAMPED" preceding the product description. The importer must identify the destination of the product to the exporter.
      1. Descriptive terms applied to meat and poultry product must be consistent with Canadian Food and Drug Regulations and the Canadian Meat Inspection Regulations. Common names of meat and poultry products for sale in Canadian commerce are specified by the Uniform Meat Cut Nomenclature System (UMCNS) and are posted in the CFIA Meat Cuts Manual at the following web link: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/fssa/labeti/mcmancv/mcmancve.shtml.
    2. Canadian mandatory label requirements. The following information must appear on all meat and poultry labels:
      1. The name of the product. Effective December 20, 2007, Common names of meat and poultry products must observe terminology found in the Uniform Meat Cut Nomenclature System (UMCNS) manual.
      2. The country of origin.
        1. The lettering " Product of USA" should be on the main label close to the product description.
        2. The lettering must be at least half the height of the largest letter on the main panel.

        Note: Mixed origin labeling (e.g. "Product of U.S., Canada, or Mexico") on product exported to Canada is not allowed. Imported poultry is prohibited unless processed in the U.S.
      3. The net quantity of the product.
        1. Net weight declaration.
          • "Net Weight", "Net" and "Net Wt," are all allowed abbreviations to be used on the label. It is also permissible to indicate the numerical units in metric and avoirdupois units without preceding words.
          • Net weight must be declared in metric units. Dual net weights, in metric and avoirdupois, are acceptable. Associated unit weight symbols (g, kg, lb, oz), as applicable, must be in lower case letters without punctuation and without the plural "s", as shown.
        2. Net weight statement.
          • Labels for products of various weights (catch weights), e.g., beef cuts, hams, turkeys, chickens, must bear a net weight statement when submitted for approval. Exporters may ship catch weight products, however, without marking the actual weight in the net weight statement on individual packages. The net weight figures may be added at the time of weighing and pricing in Canada.
          • Shipping containers containing catch weight products must show a net weight declaration and a net weight statement when shipped.
          • The words "net weight" is not necessary on a fixed net quantity statement.
      4. The list of ingredients. If mechanically separated meat (specifically, meat that has been "deboned") is an ingredient, then "mechanically separated meat" must be included as an ingredient on the label.
      5. The name and address of the firm.
        1. The complete name and address--including the name of the country--of the manufacturer or first dealer must be shown.
        2. The first dealer must be registered tenant of a USDA inspected plant or a Canadian distributor.
        3. The name of the first dealer must be preceded by the words " Prepared for".
        4. Multi-establishment firms may show the address of the central office instead of individual plants preparing the product.
      6. The USDA official inspection legend.
      7. The storage instructions.
        1. All products that are not shelf stable must provide storage information, e.g., " Keep refrigerated," or " Keep under refrigeration," if chilled product, or "Keep frozen," if frozen product, as applicable. Canada rejects frozen product in containers labeled "Keep refrigerated."
        2. The storage instruction may be in the check off form on a shipping container.
    3. Prepackaged product (consumer-size packages).
      1. Immediate containers. Labels of all consumer-size packages of meat and poultry product must show:
        1. All mandatory label requirements on the main panel.
        2. The product name, ingredients statement, and net weight in English and French.
      2. Shipping containers. It will be the packer's responsibility to ensure that the containers bear all mandatory label requirements, i.e.:
        1. The product description that is identical to the marking of the inner containers.
        2. The country of origin (Product of USA) must appear immediately below the product description. The lettering must be at least half the height of the largest letter on the main panel.
        3. The net quantity of the meat.
        4. The packer's name and address, including country.
        5. The USDA official inspection legend.
        6. The storage instructions, e.g., " Keep Refrigerated" or " Keep Frozen" for chilled and frozen product, respectively.

          Shipping containers are exempt from the bilingual labeling requirements even if the marking of the immediate container is in both official languages.
    4. Labeling sealed product (vacuum packed). Sealed packaged poultry carcasses and parts shipped in fully labeled outside containers must be marked or labeled by one of the following methods:
      1. Product individually marked with the USDA inspection legend. Frequently, frozen individually stamped product is not easily identifiable inside the package and may therefore be subject to rejection. To ensure ease of identification of product origin, it is recommended that bag closure and identification be one of the following:
        1. Heat sealed and the bag imprinted with the EST. number, e.g., "Est. 38."
        2. Closed by a clip bearing the Est/Plant number.
      2. Product not individually marked with the USDA inspection legend but packaged in:
        1. Printed sealed bags bearing all mandatory labeling information.
        2. Plain sealed bags with insert labels bearing all mandatory labeling information.
        3. Plain sealed bags with self-destructive pressure-sensitive labels applied that bear all mandatory labeling information. (Self-destructive labels are those that, once applied to the container, cannot be removed intact).
    5. Labeling of Canned Products.
      1. Canned products with lithographed labels which exhibit the country of production and establishment number must have the production date permanently marked on the body of the can. If only the country of production appears on the label, then the establishment number must be permanently marked on the body of the can as well.
      2. Canned products with removable labels must have the name of the country of origin (or an internationally recognized code), the establishment number, the code for the production date, and type of product permanently marked on the body of the can.
    6. Labeling of shipping containers.
      1. All or part of the mandatory information may be pre-printed on or applied to a shipping container by means of a self-destructive pressure-sensitive label or applied by on-line printing. (Self-destructive labels are those that, once applied to the container, cannot be removed intact).
        1. The weight may be handwritten.
        2. The use of a check-off system or stamping or stenciling of the product name is permitted.
      2. Placement of labels on containers.
        1. The label must be applied horizontally on the main panel.
          • The upper right hand corner is the main panel on a square or rectangle combo bin.
          • The label must be applied in close proximity to the top of a round combo bin.
        2. Size of label
          • The label of a small shipping carton must be of a size so that the information can be easily read.
    7. Canadian disposition of product for shipping container labeling or USDA export stamp non-compliance.
      1. The broker/importer or representative may sort rejected lots by removing all non-complying containers; or correcting any labeling deficiency, except for the export stamp, by relabeling, stenciling, or obliterating the incorrect markings on all non-complying containers.
      2. Shipping containers on which the export stamps are missing, incorrect, or are completely illegible will be permitted entry provided an official of the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) affixes the export stamp to these containers. The marking of these containers must be under the supervision of a CFIA inspector in an establishment registered for inspection of imported meat products.

        Shipping containers with export stamps partially legible will be permitted entry providing the identifying characters are identical to complete export stamps of other containers in the lot.
      3. Lots rejected for export stamp or shipping carton labeling deficiencies may be re-offered for reinspection provided all non-complying containers are removed or corrected. In the case of partial shipments, the complying portion of the shipment can enter using the original FSIS Form 9135-3, whereas the sorted, non-complying part of the shipment may be accepted, following correction of the deficiencies and on the basis of a replacement certificate.

        Entire shipments that are rejected can be re-certified when the deficiencies are corrected. The Canadian inspector will select the appropriate sampling plan and reinspect the lot.

        Note: The Canadian Inspection Agency (inspector at the reinspection establishment) must be notified of shipments of labeling to be used for relabeling. Failure to notify CFIA will result in seizure of the labeling.
    8. The Quebec requirement. A Quebec provincial "Order-in-Council", dated April 15,1967, requires that labels of products marketed as consumer ready units in the Province of Quebec be written in the French language. Though not required, it is recommended that foodservice products for Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional (HRI) trade be labeled in this manner as well. Bilingual labeling is permitted, but wording in French must precede that of the second language. The Order requires that food labels show:
      1. Product nature, composition, use, exact quantity, origin, etc.
      2. Name and address of manufacturer, preparer, conditioner, or processor.
      3. Country of origin.
  2. Specific Labeling Requirements for Poultry

    General labeling requirements are applicable.
    1. Shipping containers. Though not recommended, shipping containers with hand holds may be used for product destined to Canada, provided the product is wrapped with a protective covering. Information on the main panel of shipping containers must include:
      1. All mandatory labeling requirements.
      2. The official U.S. grade mark.
      3. The statement, if applicable: " For Further Processing".
    2. Pliofilm bags. Labels on pliofilm bags must show:
      1. All mandatory labeling requirements.
      2. The official U.S. grade mark
    3. Kidneys and sexual organs.
      1. Labels of consumer packages containing carcasses or parts from chickens under 2.7 kg (5.9 lb) live weight must contain the statement " May contain kidneys"/ " peut contenir des reins" as part of the product description on the main panel.
      2. Containers of poultry with kidneys removed should be clearly marked by lot number or other acceptable means to be readily identifiable when shipped. Record:
        1. All marks or lot numbers placed on containers.
        2. Where and when poultry was stored.
        3. The name of the inspector present during procedure.
    4. Kind name for product description. The following kind names are acceptable: chickens, chicken capons, stewing hens, young turkeys, mature turkeys, young ducks, mature ducks, young geese, and mature geese.

      Note: " Capon" may be used to describe only a carcass of a male chicken desexed by mechanical removal of testicles.
    5. "Boneless" or "bone-in" must precede the name of the species of meat, either alone or as a generic name (Example: Boneless Chicken) or it may be followed by the name of a cut acceptable in Canada.

      This requirement applies only to the labeling of shipping or bulk containers of single ingredient poultry cuts. Any deboned meat products must bear the wording "boneless" on the label as per Canadian requirements. However, if the product is boneless by nature (it was never deboned) it is not mandatory to describe it as boneless on the product label.*
    6. Grading of Poultry Carcasses.
      1. The grade designation for whole poultry carcasses destined for Canada is no longer mandatory. If graded, the grade designation (U.S. Grade A, Grade Utility, or Grade Canner) must appear on all retail packages and on all shipping cartons for poultry carcasses. Product that is eligible for a U.S. grade may be identified as such. Product that has no equivalent U.S. letter grade, such as Canada Utility or Canada Canner, is to be labeled " Grade Utility or Grade Canner."
      2. Ungraded whole poultry carcasses must be declared as "ungraded" on the export certificate. It is not necessary to include the term "ungraded" on the product label.
      3. Poultry carcasses graded for export to Canada must be accompanied with the original Poultry Products Grading Certificate (PY-210). The product description (common name) on the export certificate (FSIS Form 9135-3), as well as the product label must reflect the quality grade. The common names to be used for whole poultry carcasses are as follows:

        Chicken -- Poulet; Mature chicken -- Poulet adulte; Old rooster -- Vieux coq; Capon -- Chapon; Rock cornish hen -- Poule rock cornish; Young turkey -- Jeune dindon; Mature turkey -- Dindon adulte; Young duck -- Jeune canard; Mature duck -- Canard oie; Mature goose -- Oie adulte
      4. Poultry graded for export to Canada must satisfy the criteria for the Canadian grade, in addition to the equivalent U.S. grade standards. USDA graders have been cross- trained and will provide the following statement on the official Poultry Products Grading Certificate (PY-210):

        " Product covered by this certificate meets grade requirements for Canada _____." (The blank will indicate the appropriate Canadian grade.)
    7. Labeling of retained water in poultry
      1. The percent retained water pick up of poultry carcasses, parts, including detached necks and salvaged portions in labeling is voluntary for product exported to Canada.
      2. Zero pick up may be declared in labeling to indicate that no moisture is picked up or retained, provided the retained moisture is less that 0.5 percent.
      3. Giblets included with carcasses and prepackaged shall declare percent of retained water in labeling and must refer to the giblets, or must be truthful for both carcass and giblets with the upper limit for the giblets being the same as for the carcasses. Giblets may not exceed 8 percent retained water.
    8. With respect to poultry meat and poultry meat products of U.S. origin for just in time direct delivery to cruise ships anchored in Canadian ports, the poultry meat products will enter Canada under Canadian Customs bond and will continue directly to cruise ships anchored in the CFIA designated cruise ship terminal in Canadian ports, to be used as food for passengers and/or crew. These products must be accompanied by the original copy of the FSIS Form 9135-3.


Marking of Product

  1. Marking Requirement. The USDA official inspection legend must be applied to inspected and passed meat product as follows. This includes all product in closed containers bearing the inspection legend and all mandatory labeling information.
    1. Poultry Carcasses.
      1. Individual carcasses must be marked with a breast tag bearing the inspection legend and all other mandatory labeling information except storage instructions and weight declaration.
      2. Alternatively, carcasses must be packaged individually in containers bearing all mandatory labeling information.
    2. Parts. Parts (portions) packed in containers weighing:
      1. Up to 4.5 kg (10 lb) must bear all mandatory labeling information.
      2. More than 4.5 kg (10 lb) must be shipped in accordance with requirements for further processed product or the shipping containers must be marked " Not for Retail trade." See subparagraph "Shipment of Unmarked Product".
  2. Product Impracticable to Stamp.
    1. Small organs or cuts for which individual stamping is considered impracticable are exempt from the marking requirements. They must, however, comply with one of the following packaging procedures:
      1. Product may be packaged in fully labeled consumer-size packages.
      2. Product may be packaged in bulk containers. Labels for these containers must bear all mandatory labeling requirements.
      3. Product may be shipped as unmarked product, and if so, must meet the requirements for shipping "unmarked" product.
  3. Shipment of Unmarked and Unstamped Product (includes raw and further processed products)
    1. Definitions:
      1. Unmarked poultry products - products do not bear the poultry inspection legend directly and they are packaged in non-labeled or partially labeled containers (i.e., they are missing all or part of the information in A.2. under Labeling Requirements above)
      2. Unstamped poultry products - individual units that do not bear the USDA inspection legend but are packaged in a fully labeled shipping container (bears all mandatory information on the outside of the shipping container -see A.2. under Labeling Requirements above).

        The following packaging/labeling procedures will exempt product from USDA sealing requirements and notation of "unstamped" on the export document even though the USDA inspection legend is not found directly on the product:
        1. If the USDA legend is stamped on a sealed bag enclosing the product or applied to a breast tag on the product, it is not considered "unstamped."
        2. If an acceptable "tamper evident seal" method is used:
          • use of tape bearing the USDA inspection legend closed in such a way that the container cannot be opened without breaking the seal;
          • use of a strap bearing the company name such that the strap would have to be cut to open the container;
          • use of combo bins with a liner that can be sealed with a company seal bearing the name of the company such that the plastic strap or metal seal cannot be removed without breaking the seal or tearing the bag;
          • closing by means of a pressure sensitive label which doubles as a "tamper evident seal" which displays either the USDA inspection legend or a full label with all mandatory requirements.
          • "shrink wrapping" containers then applying a full pressure sensitive label with all mandatory requirements on the outside.

            "Unstamped" is not related in any way with presence or absence of the export stamp.
    2. Requirements for sealing shipping containers, trucks, or other types of containers conveying product to Canada.
      1. "Unmarked" poultry products may be imported into Canada provided:
        1. these products are consigned only to a Canadian registered establishment for further processing;
        2. they enter in a truck or other conveyance that is sealed with a USDA seal;
        3. the seal number is recorded on the FSIS Form 9135-3 (Meat and Poultry Export Certificate of Wholesomeness for Canada); and
        4. the product description on the certificate is preceded by the word " UNMARKED"; for example: " unmarked boneless ham". It is not necessary to have the word "UNMARKED" between parentheses or quotations nor is it necessary to have it as part of the product label. CFIA requires the use of the term "UNMARKED" as part of the certificate.
      2. "Unstamped" poultry products may be imported into Canada sealed in one of the following ways:
        1. the truck or conveyance (e.g., lined combo bin) may be sealed by a USDA seal and the seal number is recorded in the "Remarks" section of FSIS 9135-3. The product description on FSIS Form 9135-3 must also be preceded by the word "Unstamped." It is not necessary to have the word "UNSTAMPED" between parentheses or quotations nor is it necessary to have it as part of the product label. CFIA requires the use of the term "UNSTAMPED" as part of the certificate.
    3. Fully labeled poultry products, stamped product or unstamped product in sealed bags which are packaged in fully labeled shipping containers do not require tamper-evident sealing or a USDA seal on the truck/conveyance.


Documentation Requirements

  1. Certification Requirements for poultry products.
    1. The CFIA has removed the requirement for pre-clearance of the FSIS Form 9135-3, Certificate for Export of Meat and Poultry Products to Canada. This also applies to FSIS Form 9060-7 and FSIS Form 9060-18 issued for natural casings. As of February 17, 2014 the CFIA no longer processes pre-clearance review requests of export certificates or documentation.

      Details outlining the implementation dates assigned to specific Canadian importers and brokers is available. Effective the date assigned to each Canadian importer and broker the original completed and signed export certificate must be provided directly to the broker. Since the CFIA no longer pre-clears export certificates for accuracy and completeness the exporters must ensure that all data requirements are entered accurately and completely onto the FSIS Form 9135-3, FSIS Form 9060-7, FSIS Form 9060-18, and FSIS letterhead certificates. Failure to provide accurate and complete information could result in delayed, or refused, entry of the U.S. products exported to Canada. A guideline for completing export certificates for Canada is available.

      Canadian importers and brokers currently enter the import data requirements available on the export certificate into the Canadian Border Services Agency’s (CBSA’s) Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) system. The data requirements must be accurate and complete to ensure the import requirements are met to allow entry into Canada. Exporters are encouraged to work closely with their Canadian importers and brokers to prevent any potential disruption to shipments to Canada.

      Note: FSIS Form 9135-3, Certificate for Export of Meat and Poultry Products to Canada, is reprinted annually with a version corresponding to the current year (e.g., US-CA-2014). The new version becomes available in December of each year. The previous year version may be used until February 28 of the following year.
    2. All export certificates accompanying product must be signed by an FSIS veterinarian. The veterinary degree (DVM or equivalent) and the District/Circuit code must be indicated after the signature.
    3. Fresh/frozen and processed products: Obtain FSIS Form 9135-3--Certificate for Export of Meat and Poultry Products to Canada.
      1. Required information on export certificates.
        1. Must include for each product label/Est. #:
          • complete and accurate product name (if applicable, include the volume of the individual container)
          • weight of lot
          • number and type of containers in the lot (for canned product, indicate the volume of individual containers together with the number of containers within the shipping carton on the export certificate, example: (860 ml x 12)).
        2. The product description on the export certificate must be the same as that:
          • Printed on the shipping containers.
    4. Export certificate continuation sheets. Obtain FSIS Form 9135-3A when a continuation sheet is required to complete itemization of products in the shipment because of insufficient space on the FSIS Form 9135-3. Type the following statement in the "Remarks" section of FSIS Form 9135-3: " Continuation sheet attached." Do not use company letterhead or USDA/FSIS letterhead stationery.
    5. "In lieu of" Certificates. Replacement certificates issued in accordance with FSIS Directive 9000.1, Revision 1 (3/1/06) should reflect the following statement in the "Remarks" section, rather than in the left margin: "Issued in lieu of Certificate No. _____. The export mark on the product covered by this certificate shows Certificate No. _____." This is advised because the margin is often cut off when faxed to the Import Control Office in Ottawa.
    6. The export stamp. The export stamp showing the certificate number must be applied to the main panel of each shipping carton. Do NOT apply the export stamp to the export certificate.
    7. Poultry Carcasses. All shipments of graded whole poultry carcasses into Canada must be accompanied with the original grading certificate.
    8. Additional statements required for all poultry - The slaughter procedures employed must be certified using one of the following statements:
      1. Birds slaughtered with prior stunning (standard industry practice) - The following statements must be typed in the "Remarks" section of FSIS Form 9135-3 or provided on FSIS letterhead certificate for all poultry shipments to Canada:

        "The birds the meat of which is covered by the present certificate were subject to humane slaughter and were stunned before slaughter."
      2. Birds slaughtered under religious ritual slaughter practices (Halal or Kosher) which does not employ stunning - Type the following statement in the "Remarks" section of FSIS Form 9135-3 or provide on FSIS letterhead:

        "The poultry products covered by this certificate are derived from birds that received (Kosher, Halal) slaughter as based upon documentation provided by religious authorities or by (Kosher, Halal) label declaration".

        Note: delete the word Kosher or Halal in the ritual slaughter statement as applicable.
      3. Birds slaughtered by decapitation (fowl only) - Canada allows complete decapitation without prior electrical stunning as an acceptable method of slaughter for fowl. However, this procedure is acceptable only where electrical stunning results in excessive bone breakage and consequent loss and increased public health risk. Type the following statement in the "Remarks" section of FSIS Form 9135-3 or provide on FSIS letterhead:

        "The poultry products covered by this certificate are derived from fowl slaughtered by decapitation without prior electrical stunning."
  2. Pharmaceutical Requirements.
    1. Export certification of inedible products, other than technical animal fat (9 CFR 351) and certified pet food (9 CFR 355), is no longer provided by FSIS. Exporters should contact APHIS field offices to obtain information about certification of inedible products. A list of APHIS offices is available at APHIS' Web site.
    2. Obtain FSIS Form 9205-7 (7/88) formerly MP Form 17, Certificate for Glands, Organs, and Offal for Pharmaceutical Purposes only if the product bears the U.S. mark of inspection.

      Note: FSIS Form 9205-7 is now printed with the Department seal in the lower left corner and should not be stamped with the export stamp as was previously required. FSIS Form 9205-7 should be reordered to replace older forms without the Department seal.
  3. Waiver of Canadian Requirements
    1. The following statement must appear in the "remarks" section of FSIS Form 9135-3 if the company has been granted a waiver to Canadian labeling requirements:

      "The Canadian requirements for poultry product composition and labeling have been waived for the product listed above because it will be processed in Canada and exported to the U.S. or other countries."
    2. The product must be identified as "unmarked", which requires a USDA seal on the truck.
  4. Modified Procedure to Export Products Under Intensified Reinspection

    U.S. companies have the option of forwarding the original laboratory result report showing negative or enumerated results. Alternatively, the results may be typed in the remarks section of the Certificate for Export of Meat and Poultry Products (FSIS Form 9135-3), i.e., "Products tested for __________ with the following results: __________ (negative, not detected, X ppm, etc.)".
  5. Poultry exported to Canada for further processing and subsequently exported to Japan - Upon the request of the exporter, the following information must be provided either in the "Remarks" section of FSIS Form 9135-3 or on an FSIS letterhead certificate (which is signed by the same FSIS veterinarian signing the export certificate):
    1. Statements for all products intended for re-export to Japan:

      "The meat and/or meat products described herein were processed under sanitary conditions in accordance with laws and regulations of the United States. The laws and regulations of the United States have been deemed to be equivalent to the inspection laws of Japan."

      "There have been no outbreaks of fowl pest (fowl plague) for at least 90 days in the United States. Further, in the area where birds for export (meat) were produced (such an area being within a minimum radius of 50 kilometers from the production farm), Newcastle disease, fowl cholera, and other serious infectious fowl diseases, as recognized by the United States, have not occurred for at least 90 days."
    2. Poultry is restricted for export to Japan from certain States for specific periods. Certification must be provided that poultry did not originate from or transit unsealed through these States during the restricted periods relative to each affected State. Obtain the appropriate statements from the Japan requirements.
  6. Poultry and poultry products exported to Canada for further processing and subsequently exported to Mexico - Upon the request of the exporter, provided that the slaughter and/or processing facility is listed on the FSIS Eligible Plants List for Mexico and the product itself is eligible for export to Mexico, the following information must be provided either in the &quotRemarks&quot section of FSIS Form 9135-3 or on an FSIS Letterhead Certificate:

    "The product originated from slaughter and/or processing establishments in the United States of America approved by the Mexican Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fish and Food (SAGARPA). The facilities where product originates are listed on the FSIS Eligible Plant List for Mexico."
  7. Poultry and poultry products of U.S. origin for just in time direct delivery to cruise ships anchored in designated cruise ship Canadian ports must have the following certification statement in the Remarks section of FSIS Form 9135-3 or on an FSIS Letterhead Certificate:

    "The Canadian requirements for poultry products composition and labeling have been waived. The poultry products covered by this certificate are intended for direct and just in time delivery to cruise ships anchored in designated cruise ship facilities in Canadian ports."

Handling/Storage Requirements

  1. Combo Bins
    1. Only fresh poultry cuts are permitted entry in combo bins. The use of combo bins for export of frozen poultry cuts is prohibited. (Frozen cuts are permitted entry only in closed shipping containers bearing all mandatory labeling requirements.)
    2. Combo bins must be consigned directly to Canadian registered establishments.
    3. Combo bins must bear all mandatory labeling information for shipping containers.
  2. The use of carbon monoxide (CO) in Modified Atmospheric Packaging (MAP) is allowed up to 0.4% CO of suitable food grade quality when used in an outer barrier bag containing a packaged retail poultry cut, but not when it is in direct contact with fresh poultry.
  3. Truckload or Carload Lots

    Placards. Loose or bulk poultry and edible fats conveyed in railroad cars, trucks, or trailers must be accompanied by a placard (12"x12") that bears all mandatory labeling requirements. The placard must be affixed to the door of the vehicle containing poultry and in a conspicuous location of the vehicle containing edible fats.
  4. Repackaging of Imported Product Prior to Export to Canada
    1. The repackaging of imported product prior to export to Canada from a foreign plant's boxes to U.S. plant's boxes is permitted provided that the product is further processed during the repackaging procedure.
    2. Repackaging of imported product without further processing of the product is prohibited. Switching product from one vacuum pack to another vacuum pack with a different establishment number is not considered further processing.
  5. Handling Inedible Product. Canada requires that:
    1. The chilling, packing, and marking of inedible poultry products for animal food must be carried out in rooms or areas where poultry product for human consumption is not handled.
    2. A poultry product that is not approved for human food but is passed for animal food must be directed to and processed in a designated room of the inedible products area.
    3. Inedible meat products identified for animal food must be denatured prior to their export to Canada.



Inedible Product for Animal Food (See Meat and Poultry requirements)

  1. Inedible Product for Animal Food.
    1. Export certification of inedible products, other than technical animal fat (9 CFR 351) and certified pet food (9 CFR 355), is no longer provided by FSIS. Exporters should contact APHIS field offices to obtain information about certification of inedible products. A list of APHIS offices is available at APHIS' Web site.


Other Requirements

  1. Hyperchlorination of Water.

    Poultry and poultry products intended for export to Canada may be processed with hyperchlorinated water. Plants must follow the U.S. guidelines for the use of hyperchlorinated water. Canadian requirements allow the chilling of reprocessed birds in the same chill tank as regular production provided the process is controlled under a HACCP plan implemented in accordance with 9 CFR Part 417.
  2. Use of Trisodium Phosphate (TSP).

    The following conditions apply to the use of TSP:
    1. The TSP solution, dissolved in water to a concentration between 8% and 12%, may be applied only to raw poultry carcasses that have been inspected.
    2. The TSP solution must be maintained between 45° F (7.2° C) and 55° F (12.8° C) for raw chilled poultry (i.e., post chill).
    3. The TSP treatment solution must be continuously circulated through a filtration system.
    4. Exposure of the carcasses to the TSP solution cannot exceed 15 seconds for the pre-chill or post-chill
  3. Canadian import inspectors must be able to view the export stamp and product labels on cartons/combos that are placed on the rear of the truck. It is advisable to position these cartons and/or combos at the time of loading in order to avoid any delays at the border.
    1. If the inspector is unable to verify the export stamp or the product labels, the company has three options:
      1. Have a carton/combo removed or turned around so the inspector can examine the shipping container at the border,
      2. move the product to the designated reinspection facility in Canada so the Canadian inspector can verify the information on the shipping container,
      3. or upon request of the U.S. exporter or the Canadian importer, move the product to any other Canadian reinspection facility that may be closer to the border for visual inspection by the Canadian inspector.
    2. Full reinspection of a shipment designated as a "skip lot" will only occur if there is a problem with the export stamp or shipping label.
  4. Return of USDA-Accepted Canadian Export Product.
    1. Canadian export product that has passed U.S. import inspection. Meat and poultry exported to the United States from Canada becomes U.S. product after it has passed U.S. import inspection and has been released to the importer. To export this product back to Canada, the product must be certified for export under the usual USDA certification procedure. However, FSIS Form 9135-3 does not need to be submitted for preverification by CFIA prior to shipping. The following statements must be typed in the "Remarks" section of FSIS Form 9135-3:
      1. " The product originated in Canada."
      2. " The product has been under USDA control for the duration of its stay in the United States."
    2. Immediate return of product. An exception to subparagraph 1.must be made if the shipment is returned immediately and is accompanied by all original export certificates. The product is ineligible for entry into Canada if not accompanied by the applicable certificates. Exporters may wish to contact Canadian regional inspection officials in the region in which the origin plant is located for advice on return of product on a case basis.
  5. Return of U.S. Product Rejected in Canada - Information about the procedures to return export products to the United States is available on the Export Products Returned to the United States page of the FSIS Web site.
  6. Personal consumption. Meat or poultry product weighing 44 lb (20 kg) or less intended for personal consumption of the traveler is permitted entry without export documentation. This includes product sold through mail order, which needs to identify the consumer on the packing slip or company letterhead and indicate that the product is not intended for resale.
  7. Sample/Research Product
    1. Meat or poultry product weighing up to 220 lb (100 kg) intended for sample or research use and not for sale is permitted entry without export documentation provided that:
      1. A packing slip or letter is enclosed bearing the establishment, name, and address of the plant, product name and weight, and the statement: "Not for Sale."
      2. The outer carton is marked: "Sample - Not For Sale."
      3. The Canadian importer has provided declaration for entry of the sample.
    2. For additional assistance sending sample/research product into Canada, contact the appropriate regional office: Moncton, New Brunswick; (506) 851-7400: Montreal, Quebec, (514) 283-8888; Guelph, Ontario, (519) 837-9400; Winnipeg, Manitoba, (204) 983-4769; Calgary, Alberta, (403) 292-4364; Vancouver, British Columbia, (604) 666-0841.
  8. Mechanically Separated Species.
    1. Compositional standards:
      1. The calcium content shall not exceed 0.027% for each one percent (1%) of protein.
      2. The maximum bone particle size shall not exceed 2 mm.
    2. Kidneys must be removed from poultry carcasses or parts prior to their use as material for mechanical separation.
    3. Mechanically separated meat from poultry origin must be declared as such in the ingredient statement on labels of further processed products.
  9. Sealing shipments of meat products exported from the U.S. into Canada.
    1. An official USDA seal is required for shipments of "unmarked" or "unstamped" products.
    2. The following conditions must be met if a shipment must be resealed (or an additional seal must be applied) after the export certificate has been issued:
      1. Removal of the initial seal, unloading, loading, and resealing the vehicle must be done under the supervision of the USDA inspector.
      2. The USDA inspector must issue a letter on USDA letterhead with the following information: Identify the US-CA certificate number, the initial seal number, the replacement seal number and the reason why a replacement seal was needed.
    3. This letter should accompany the original certificate to the border. Do NOT add a second seal number to the certificate. Altering the certificate in any way invalidates the certificate, which will result in rejection at the border.
  10. Tray pack, club pack, or jacket pack product - Canned or other retail labeled product is sometimes shipped in trays or other minimally enclosed packing method which is equivalent to case packing except that it does not afford adequate surface area on which to apply a shipping label or the export stamp. Such product may be palletized, shrink-wrapped and shipped bearing one shipping label and one export stamp per pallet provided the following are met:
    1. Pallets must contain the same type of product,
    2. the shipping label to be placed on the pallet must bear all mandatory Canadian labeling requirements according to Labeling Section A.7. and include the inspection legend and export stamp,
    3. retail units must be production coded and codes must be listed on FSIS Form 9135-3, Certificate for Export of Meat and Poultry Products, and
    4. the consignee listed on FSIS Form 9135-3 must be the point of purchase for the product (after the shrink wrap is broken, tray packs may not move in commerce in Canada).

      When completing FSIS Form 9135-3 (center blocks), exporters must enter a description of the tray pack and product name, e.g. Luncheon Meat (3x 340g), the number of tray packs, club packs, etc., and net weight for each type of product (retail label).
  11. Guaranteed Replacement Certificates - Shipments of U.S. meat and poultry detained by CFIA inspectors for certain types of certification errors may be released based on the exporting firm's or their representative's guarantee that a replacement certificate will be provided. Before requesting a guarantee, it should be determined if a replacement certificate can be issued by FSIS. Following FSIS Directive 9000.1, the valid reasons for replacing a certificate are: the original certificate did not carry required information, the original certificate carried incorrect information, or the name of consignee or exporter has changed. Replacement certificates cannot be issued when net weight or case count of the shipment exceeds the net weight or case count shown on the certificate.

    The original certificate will be stamped "refused entry." The U.S. exporter (or Canadian importer) will have 2 working days to notify the CFIA import inspector that a replacement certificate will be issued and guaranteed. Procedures established to provide the guarantee and the replacement certificate must be followed.


Plants Eligible to Export

All federally inspected U.S. meat and poultry plants are recognized initially as eligible to export to Canada. FSIS Form 9080-3 is not needed.  However, exporters must make sure that their establishments are listed in the current FSIS Meat and Poultry Inspection Directory to prevent any delays in getting their certificates approved. Contact Import Export Coordination and Policy Development Staff at (202) 720-0082 or (855) 444-9904, for assistance.


Plants Not Eligible to Export

Meat and poultry and meat and poultry products produced at the following establishments are not eligible for export to Canada until further notice. In addition, meat and poultry products produced at other establishments from material originating from these establishments are also not eligible for export to Canada.

Est 2646/P-2646, Johnston County Hams, Smithfield, NC. Effective for product produced on or after April 17, 2007.

Est 2041/P-657, H.J. Heinz Co., Muscatine, IA. Effective December 24, 2012 export certification should not be issued for product produced at this establishment.

Est. 34483, Mongiello Italian Cheese Special, 250 Hilldale Road, Hurleyville, NY. Effective October 31, 2013 export certification should not be issued for product produced at this establishment.

Est. 527, Rancho Feeding Corporation, 1522 Petaluma Blvd. North, Petaluma, CA. Effective February 17, 2014 export certification should not be issued for product produced at this establishment.


 

Last Modified Aug 29, 2014