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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Text of Print Ads

Note: This alternative text is provided for accessibility purposes. The PDF versions of the print ads are the "printer friendly" versions.

Print Ad, All Products

"Is it done yet?" [Photo of Dad and daughter at the barbecue grill, checking internal temperature of hamburgers with digital instant-read food thermometer.]

Did you know? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that every year about 76 million people in the United States become ill from harmful bacteria in food; of these, about 5,000 die.

[Photos of food thermometers in a variety of meat and poultry products]

You can't tell by looking . Use a food thermometer to be sure.

www.IsItDoneYet.gov
United States Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service


Print Ad Featuring Steak

"Is it done yet?" [Photo of Dad and daughter at the barbecue grill, checking internal temperature of hamburgers with digital instant-read food thermometer.]

You can't tell by looking . Use a food thermometer to be sure.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that every year about 76 million people in the United States become ill from harmful bacteria in food; of these, about 5,000 die. Foodborne illness is preventable. Cooking and reheating food to a safe minimum internal temperature kills potentially dangerous bacteria. You can prevent foodborne illness by using a food thermometer.

USDA Recommended Temperatures: Steak, 145 °F [Photo of a food thermometer, reading 145 °F, in a T-bone steak.]

www.IsItDoneYet.gov
United States Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service


  Print Ad Featuring Ground Beef

"Is it done yet?" [Photo of Mom and son cooking hamburgers on a cooktop grill, using an instant-read food thermometer to check doneness.]

You can't tell by looking . Use a food thermometer to be sure.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that every year about 76 million people in the United States become ill from harmful bacteria in food; of these, about 5,000 die. Foodborne illness is preventable. Cooking and reheating food to a safe minimum internal temperature kills potentially dangerous bacteria. You can prevent foodborne illness by using a food thermometer.

USDA Recommended Temperatures: Ground beef, 160 °F [Photo of a digital food thermometer, reading 160 °F, in a juicy, grilled hamburger.]

www.IsItDoneYet.gov
United States Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service


Print Ad Featuring Lasagne

"Is it done yet?" [Photo of a baked lasagne, with oven-safe food thermometer in its center, resting on oven shelf. The cook is preparing to remove it from the oven.]

You can't tell by looking . Use a food thermometer to be sure.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that every year about 76 million people in the United States become ill from harmful bacteria in food; of these, about 5,000 die. Foodborne illness is preventable. Cooking and reheating food to a safe minimum internal temperature kills potentially dangerous bacteria. You can prevent foodborne illness by using a food thermometer.

USDA Recommended Temperatures: Casseroles and leftovers, 165 °F

www.IsItDoneYet.gov
United States Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service


Print Ad Featuring Chicken Breast

"Is it done yet?" [Photo of woman pan-frying a chicken breast. An instant-read food thermometer is inserted in thickest part; she is using a holder to keep the thermometer upright and keep the dial in view.]

You can't tell by looking . Use a food thermometer to be sure.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that every year about 76 million people in the United States become ill from harmful bacteria in food; of these, about 5,000 die. Foodborne illness is preventable. Cooking and reheating food to a safe minimum internal temperature kills potentially dangerous bacteria. You can prevent foodborne illness by using a food thermometer.

USDA Recommended Temperatures: Chicken breast, 165 °F [Photo of a digital food thermometer, reading 165 °F, in a grilled chicken breast.]

www.IsItDoneYet.gov
United States Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service


Print Ad Featuring Roast Turkey

"Is it done yet?" [Photo of a golden brown, roast turkey on the oven shelf, in a metal roasting pan. There is an oven-safe food thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the inner thigh.]

You can't tell by looking . Use a food thermometer to be sure.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that every year about 76 million people in the United States become ill from harmful bacteria in food; of these, about 5,000 die. Foodborne illness is preventable. Cooking and reheating food to a safe minimum internal temperature kills potentially dangerous bacteria. You can prevent foodborne illness by using a food thermometer.

USDA Recommended Temperatures: Turkey; Chicken (legs & thighs), 165°F [Photo of a digital food thermometer, reading 165 °F, in a baked chicken leg/thigh quarter.]

www.IsItDoneYet.gov
United States Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service

 

Last Modified Aug 28, 2013