dark overlay
nav button USDA Logo

FSIS

Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

Actions
Loading...

Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

Actions
Loading...

Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

Actions
Loading...

Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

Actions
Loading...

Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

Actions
Loading...

Script: The 2010 Food Safety Education Conference

 

Podcasts
Script: The 2010 Food Safety Education Conference
Intro:
Welcome to USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service Food Safety at home podcast series. These podcasts were designed with you in mind - the consumer - who purchases and prepares meat, poultry and processed meat, egg products for your family and friends.

Each episode will bring you a different food safety topic ranging from safe storage, handling, and preparation of meat, poultry and processed egg products to the importance of keeping foods safe during a power outage.

So sit back, turn up the volume and listen in.


Host:
Welcome to “Food Safety at Home.” I’m Kathy Bernard with the Food Safety and Inspection Service. I’m your host for this segment. With me today is Eileen Dykes, public affairs specialist from FSIS’ Food Safety Education Staff. Eileen and I will discuss USDA’s 2010 Food Safety Education Conference.

Hello Eileen, welcome to the show.

Guest:
Thank you Kathy, I’m pleased to be here.

USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service is hosting its fourth food safety education conference, titled “Advancements in Food Safety Education: Trends, Tools and Technology” on March 23rd through the 26th, 2010 in Atlanta, Georgia. The conference provides an opportunity to share the most recent information on successful educational strategies for positively influencing consumer food handling and preparation behaviors. Empowering consumers with knowledge and safer food-handling behaviors is one of the best lines of defense against pathogens causing illnesses.

Host:
What topics will you cover?

Guest:
Some of the topics to be presented are: causes and effects of foodborne illness; behavioral and attitudinal research; social marketing trends and consumer outreach, and the role of new technologies, such as You Tube and Facebook, in consumer education and risk communication.

Host:
I understand FSIS will be hosting the event with NSF International, a non-profit public health organization.

Guest:
That’s correct Kathy. Other sponsoring organizations include the Department of Health and Human Services’ Food and Drug Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, NSF/World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Food Safety, USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, the Food and Nutrition Service, and the Partnership for Food Safety Education.

Host:
The title “Advancements in Food Safety Education: Trends, Tools and Technologies” is very intriguing. Could you elaborate on this?

Guest:
Yes. The conference will explore and showcase how new social marketing trends, tools and technologies have been successfully used to reach the consumer and affect behavior change in an increasingly crowded information environment. For example, our Friday plenary session, “Using Social Media” will highlight various applications of social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, as well as methods of evaluating the successful use of these tools. Speakers will be from various government agencies and the private sector.

Another session will include an interactive panel to discuss social marketing in the media. This panel will review the media’s perspective of consumer messaging and focus on what kind of “hook” educators can use to encourage various media sources to promote their food safety messages.

The “Causes and Casualties” session will highlight estimating the burden of foodborne illness, methods used to gather and analyze information, challenges in identifying and reporting foods that cause illness and how food safety equates to preventive health.

Host:
Based on the content, it sounds like this conference would interest a wide array of public health professionals and food safety educators.

Guest:
You’re right Kathy. There has been much interest generated across a broad range of professionals interested in food safety, including, public health educators and health care providers; food safety educators; food industry professionals; trade, consumer, and health associations; and health writers and journalists.

Host:
The entire conference sounds like a really exciting event. How can our listeners learn more about it?

Guest:
For more conference information, listeners can go to our Web site, www.fsis.usda.gov/atlanta2010 where the program schedule and registration information can be viewed.

Host:
That’s it for this week. We’ve been talking to Eileen Dykes from the FSIS’ Food Safety Education Staff. Thank you so much Eileen, for your information on the 2010 Food Safety Education Conference. I’m Kathy Bernard and I’d like to thank you for joining us for this episode of “Food Safety at Home.” And remember, “Be Food Safe.”


Outro:
Well, that's all for this time. Thanks for joining us today for another episode of food safety at home!

For answers to your food safety questions call USDA's toll-free Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline. That's 1-888-674-6854.

You can also get answers to food safety questions online from our virtual representative "Ask Karen" at askkaren.gov .

Let us know what you think of this podcast by sending your comments to podcast@fsis.usda.gov.
Thanks for tuning in.
Last Modified Nov 08, 2013