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Script: Grilling Safely with Bobbie and Sam

 

Podcasts
Script: Grilling Safely with Bobbie and Sam
Intro:
Welcome to USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service “Food Safety At Home” podcast series, featuring topics for the safe handling, preparation and storage of meat, poultry and processed egg products.

Bobbie:
Hey Sam, the arrival of summer makes me want to barbeque. Let’s get the grill out today and have a cookout.

Sam:
Let’s do it! I’ll get the grill ready and you can buy some chicken, hamburgers, hot dogs, and other barbeque fixin’s.

Bobbie:
Okay, but I don’t think the grill was cleaned since the last time we used it. If it needs cleaning, make sure to do it before we begin to cook.

Sam:
Don’t worry. The grill will be clean, hot and ready to cook when you get back.

Bobbie:
Okay, I’ll see you in a little bit.

Sam:
(Talking to himself aloud) I’ll get the grill from the garage and have it ready for Bobbie when she gets back. Oh, no! It does still have last season’s gunk on the grates! It’s a good thing I still have the manual, so I can find out how to clean them.

Let’s see; there are seven steps to follow.
  • Step 1: Remove cooking grates and set them in warm soapy
    water to soak.
  • 2. Remove briquettes, lava rocks or metal flame shield to expose the burner.
  • 3. Clean out ash and residue from around the burner.
  • 4. Use a stiff wire brush and a little soapy water to scrub grates and the inside surfaces of the grill.
  • 5. Put the burner and grates back in the grill and let the entire grill air dry.
  • 6. Coat the inside surfaces and cooking grates with cooking oil or spray.
  • 7. Allow an extra five minutes of heating time to make sure any cleaning residue has burned off the burner and grates.

Well, that’s done! I’ll turn on the grill so it’s nice and hot for those chicken legs, hot dogs and burgers. I can taste them already!

Bobbie:
Sam, I’m home! Is the grill ready?

Sam:
Yes!

Bobbie:
I’ll get the food ready to cook and be out in a few minutes.

Sam:
Okay, do you need any help?

Bobbie:
Sure, I could use some help.

Sam:
What do you need me to do?

Bobbie:
Well, first wash your hands for at least 20 seconds in warm soapy water to get the dirt off. Then, remove the wrapping from the chicken and put it in that clean bowl to take out to the grill. Go ahead and start cooking the chicken. I’ll get the burgers ready and bring them out with the hot dogs in just a few minutes.

Sam:
Sure, no problem. How long does it take to cook chicken on the grill again?

Bobbie:
Well, it’s not a matter of time, but rather the internal temperature of what you’re cooking. The chicken legs need to reach a minimum internal temperature of one hundred and sixty-five degrees Fahrenheit, as measured with a food thermometer. The burgers are made with ground beef, so their temperature needs to reach one hundred and sixty degrees Fahrenheit. The hot dogs need to reach one hundred and sixty-five degrees Fahrenheit.

Sam:
Oh, I get it. So, the temperature changes depending on the type of poultry or meat used.

Bobbie:
Exactly!

Sam:
I’ll check the temperature of the chicken, burgers and hot dogs.

Bobbie:
Wait, Sam. You need to clean the thermometer after you check each food because you could cause cross-contamination.

Sam:
What’s cross-contamination?

Bobbie:
Cross-contamination occurs when harmful bacteria from one food are transferred to other foods, cutting boards, utensils, surfaces, or hands.

That’s why you need to clean the thermometer in between uses. If you check the chicken’s temperature and it’s not done, then you check the temperature of the hot dogs, and they are done, well, you’ve just possibly put harmful bacteria into the hot dogs. Just remember that it’s safer to clean the thermometer in between uses.

Sam:
Don’t worry, I’ll remember.

Okay, everything is at a safe internal temperature. Let’s eat! Bobbie, hand me that bowl that I had the chicken in earlier.

Bobbie:
No, Sam! You can’t use that bowl again. It still has the juices from the raw chicken. That’s another way to cross-contaminate your cooked food. I’ll get a clean platter for the cooked meats.

Sam:
Ummm! This chicken tastes great!

Bobbie:
And it’s safe too. (both laugh)

Narrator:
You’e just heard a dialogue between Sam and Bobbie about grilling and food safety. The Food Safety and Inspection Service created the “Food Safety at Home” program to inform consumers about food safety.

Listeners can learn more about Food Safety and Grilling by visiting the FSIS Web site at www.fsis.usda.gov. Or visit us online for assistance from our virtual representative “Ask Karen” at askkaren.gov, that’s askkaren.gov.

Consumers may also call our toll-free USDA Meat & Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline. That’s 1-888-674-6854.

Thank you for joining us on this episode of “Food Safety at Home,” and remember, “Be Food Safe.”


Outro:
Thanks for listening to this Food Safety At Home podcast. Let us know what you think of this podcast by sending your comments to podcast@fsis.usda.gov.

Last Modified Nov 08, 2013