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Script: USDA's Food Safety Mobile, the Food Safety Discovery Zone

 

Podcasts
Script: USDA’s Food Safety Mobile, the Food Safety Discovery Zone
Intro:
Welcome to USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service “Food Safety At Home” podcast series, featuring topics for the safe handling, preparation and storage of meat, poultry and processed egg products.

Hi, this is Karen, Carol, and I’m Cody, and today we are going to talk about the new Food Safety Mobile, now called the Food Safety Discovery Zone, a traveling educational program of the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service. It’s a new “kitchen on wheels” that will soon be traveling across our beautiful country showing Americans how to “Be Food Safe!”

Carol:
The Food Safety Mobile will hit the road in Spring, 2010, and may be heading to your town!

Karen:
The Food Safety Discovery Zone is a 40-foot truck that features several hands-on, interactive activities, cool lighting and sound effects, and eye-catching educational tools to teach folks about the four easy steps that families can take to avoid foodborne illness.

Carol: Clean !

Karen: Separate !

Cody: Cook !

Carol: and Chill !

Karen:
Folks will be invited into the vehicle for a “hands-on” experience, including audio-visual presentations, real microscopes where you can see bacteria, and fun games to test your food safety knowledge.

Cody:
Karen, why is it so important for all of us to learn about Food Safety in our homes?

Karen:
Cody, some bacteria in food can make people very sick. A foodborne illness can cause stomach aches, stomach cramping, or diarrhea, and in more severe cases can cause dehydration, kidney failure and even death.

Karen and Cody:
“Eeew – who is that?!”

Carol:
That’s BAC! ... Bacteria – our enemy in the kitchen – and our enemy on the Food Safety Mobile.

Cody:
Don’t tell me BAC is going on the road with us?

Carol:
Oh yeah, BAC is everywhere. He really knows where to hide, and he loves tagging along...especially where there is food. He loves to live in your kitchen and grow on your food.

Karen:
But you can fight BAC! By following the four easy steps to food safety that we will be teaching in the Food Safety Mobile. And, by making these four steps part of your kitchen routine, you can ensure that BAC won’t make you or anyone in your family sick.

Cody:
Ladies, what are four steps to Food Safety that folks will learn about in the USDA Food Safety Mobile?

Carol:
The first step is to CLEAN

This sounds as simple as washing your hands, but believe it or not, many people skimp on this very important step. The key to being CLEAN is to wash your hands with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds. We will use a powder that glows in the dark to show you how bacteria can still be on your hands after you wash them if you don’t do it properly. You also need to make sure you wash your countertops and utensils with hot soapy water before and after preparing food.

Cody:
Karen, what is the second easy step to Food Safety?

Karen:
The next step is to SEPARATE to prevent cross-contamination.
It’s important to keep raw meat or their juices away from other foods, in your grocery cart, in your refrigerator, or on the cutting board. Two different cutting boards should be used: one for raw meat or poultry, and the other for foods, such as vegetables, cheeses, or other ingredients that will not be cooked. If you don’t have two cutting boards, then make sure you wash the cutting board and the countertop with soap and hot water before moving onto the next step in preparing your food.

Cody:
I know the next step! – it’s COOK - That’s my FAVORITE step because it comes right before EATING!

Did you know that you can’t tell if cooked meat or poultry is safe to eat by looking at it?

Carol:
You mean you can’t judge a burger by its looks?

Cody:
Nope, you should always use a food thermometer to check the internal temperature of cooked meat, poultry, or fish. Hamburgers or ground beef should be cooked to a minimum internal temperature of one hundred and sixty degrees Fahrenheit; chicken and turkey to one hundred sixty five degrees Fahrenheit, and fish should be cooked to one hundred forty five degrees Fahrenheit. You should place the thermometer in the center or thickest part of the food to be sure you get an accurate reading.

“Remember, it’s not safe to bite until the temperature’s right!”
Karen:
OK – so far we have learned about the first 3 steps to being “food safe” - CLEAN, SEPARATE, and COOK….Carol, what’s the final step to Food Safety?

Carol:
CHILL (says it like it is “cool”) –

Once you’ve prepared your food safely, and enjoyed it, any leftovers should be refrigerated right away. Did you know that bacteria on food can double every 20 minutes? Food should never be left out at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If the temperature is above 90 degrees Fahrenheit, don’t leave food out for more than 1 hour.

You should also make sure your refrigerator is operating properly at a minimum temperature of 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below.

Cody:
So the steps to Food Safety are: Clean, Separate, Cook, and Chill!

Carol and Karen:
That’s right Cody!

Cody:
Okay, but how is the food safety mobile going to help teach people these steps?

Karen:
The United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service knows how important it is for people to learn these steps to Food Safety, so that’s why the USDA Food Safety Mobile, now called the Food Safety Discovery Zone will be taking the message to the streets, in big cities and small towns across America. Beginning in Spring, 2010, we will be visiting state fairs, sporting events, food festivals, tailgates, grocery stores, and schools – among other events – to reach out to Americans – so that everyone can learn how to Be Food Safe, and so that everyone can begin incorporating these steps into their daily routine, making Food Safety a habit – thereby preventing illnesses and saving lives.

Cody:
That’s great! And you can learn more about the traveling Food Safety Discovery Zone by visiting us on the FSIS website at FSIS.USDA.GOV under educational materials and campaigns. We will have the 2010 schedule posted, so you can see where we will be traveling, play food safety games, ask food safety questions, and learn more about Food Safety.

Carol:
Well, we’ve gotta go for now.

Karen, Cody, and Carol:
This is Karen, Carol, and Cody –from the USDA Food Safety Discovery Zone!

Cody:
You and your family are invited to stop by and see us at an event near you!

Carol:
And if you know of an event in your city that you would like us to consider visiting, let us know by sending an email to foodsafetymobile@fsis.usda.gov.

Karen:
Thanks for listening today. We’ll SEE YA SOON!

Host:
Consumers with food safety questions may call our toll-free USDA Meat & Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline. That’s 1-888-674-6854.

That’s it for this week. We’ve been listening to Karen, Carol, and Cody talk about USDA’s new Food Safety Mobile, the Food Safety Discovery Zone, and remember “Be Food Safe”.


Outro:
Thanks for listening to this Food Safety At Home podcast. Let us know what you think of this podcast by sending your comments to podcast@fsis.usda.gov.
Last Modified Nov 08, 2013