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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Reaching At-Risk Audiences and Today's Other Food Safety Challenges
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Foodborne illness, a preventable and underreported disease, is a public health and economic challenge in the United States. While it regularly strikes people in the general population, some—including pregnant
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women, young children, older adults, and those with weakened immune systems—are at even greater risk. Sharing food safety information with all populations and encouraging positive behavior modification during food preparation and consumption is necessary to reduce exposure to pathogens known to cause foodborne illness. The reduction of foodborne illness requires accurate diagnosis and timely reporting. It also requires public health intervention along the entire farm-to-table continuum. Food safety education and behavioral modification is the critical intervention at the table-end of this continuum.

Public health professionals and health care providers who develop health policy and who educate and medically treat general and at-risk populations are essential to recognizing, treating, and reducing foodborne illness. Food safety educators who develop and conduct food safety risk communication and outreach programs fill critical roles in communicating science-based food safety principles and practices that encourage positive behavior change among general and at-risk populations. Food industry professionals who write policy, provide food products, and create and distribute food safety information provide necessary safeguards in protecting both general and at-risk populations from foodborne illness. And scientific writers and journalists, along with other media, trade and health associations, and consumer groups provide a strong link in the food safety chain by sharing information with all populations. It is only through the efforts of all of these groups that we can create positive behavior modification during food preparation and consumption, which is so necessary to reduce exposure to pathogens known to cause foodborne illness.

This conference will address these issues.

Goals
  • To share current surveillance and epidemiological data on foodborne illness
  • To present strategies leading to enhanced food safety knowledge, skills, and abilities and in attitudinal and behavioral modification in general and at-risk populations
  • To communicate the latest science-based safe food handling principles and practices
Last Modified May 31, 2013