dark overlay
nav button USDA Logo

FSIS

Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

Actions
Loading...

Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

Actions
Loading...

Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

Actions
Loading...

Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

Actions
Loading...

Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

Actions
Loading...

Glossary - R

Archive Page. Archived files are provided for reference purposes only. This file was current when produced, but is no longer maintained and may now be outdated.

 

View Glossary terms beginning with:

Rancid/Rancidity
Oxidation/breakdown of fat that occurs naturally, causing undesirable smell and taste.

Ratites
A family of large flightless birds that include ostriches, emus, and rheas, which U.S. farmers are beginning to domesticate and raise for food. On April 26, 2001, FSIS mandated the inspection of ratites. As a result of this action U.S. establishments slaughtering or processing ratites for distribution into commerce as human food are now subject to mandatory requirements of the Poultry Products Inspection Act and no longer pay a fee for inspection. Previously, some ratites had been inspected under the Agency’s voluntary poultry inspection program, which requires establishments to pay a fee for inspection services.

Ready-to-Eat
Food that is in a form that is edible without washing, cooking, or additional preparation by the food establishment or consumer and that is reasonably expected to be consumed in that form.

Recall
Recalls are voluntary actions carried out by a food manufacturer or distributor in cooperation with Federal and State agencies. Products are recalled when found to be contaminated, adulterated, or misbranded. Even when the food has been previously inspected and passed by FSIS, a recall is necessary when new information becomes available indicating a possible public health issue. A recall does not include a market withdrawal or stock recovery.

Recall Classifications
FSIS assesses the public health concern or hazard presented by a product being recalled, or considered for recall, whether firm-initiated or requested by FSIS, and classifies the concern as one of the following:

  1. Class I. This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death. For example, the presence of pathogens in ready-to-eat product or the presence of E. coli O157:H7 in ground beef.
  2. Class II. This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product. For example, the presence of undeclared allergens such as milk or soy products.
  3. Class III. This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences. For example, the presence of undeclared generally recognized as safe non-allergen substances, such as excess water.
Recall, Depth of
The level of product distribution to which the recall is to extend:
  1. Consumer - This includes household consumers as well as all other levels of distribution.
  2. Retail Level - The level that includes all retail sales of the recalled product.
  3. User Level - This level includes hotels, restaurants, and other food service institutional consignees.
  4. Wholesale Level - The distribution level between the manufacturer and the retailer. This level may not be encountered in every recall situation; i.e., the recalling firm may sell directly to the retail or consumer level.

Recall Scope
This defines the amount and kind of product in question. For example, all products produced under a single HACCP plan between performance of complete cleaning and sanitation procedures (clean up to clean up).

Renderer
A business engaged in the separation of fats from animal tissue by heating.

Residue
Any substance, including metabolites, remaining in livestock at time of slaughter or in carcass tissues after slaughter as the result of treatment or exposure of the livestock to a pesticide, organic or inorganic compound, hormone, hormonelike substance, growth promoter, antibiotic, anthelmintic, tranquilizer, or other therapeutic or prophylactic agent.

Risk Analysis
The assessment and management of hazards that cause harm (risk) to human health and the communication of how those hazards can be controlled, reduced or eliminated.

Risk Assessment
The process of estimating the severity and likelihood of harm to human health or the environment occurring from exposure to a substance or activity that, under plausible circumstances, can cause harm to human health or the environment.

Risk Communication
Exchanges of information among risk assessors, risk managers, other stakeholders, and the public about levels of health or environmental risk, the significance and meaning of those risks, and the decisions, actions, or policies aimed at managing or controlling the risks.

Risk Management
The process of evaluating policy alternatives in view of the results of risk assessment and selecting and implementing appropriate options to protect public health. Risk management determines what action to take to reduce, eliminate, or control risks. This includes establishing risk assessment policies, regulations, procedures, and a framework for decision making based on risk.

Roaster or Roasting Chicken
A bird of this class is a young chicken, usually three to five months of age, of either sex, that is tender-meated with soft, pliable, smooth-textured skin and breastbone cartilage that may be somewhat less flexible than that of a broiler or fryer.

Roaster Duckling
A young duck, usually under 16 weeks of age, of either sex, that is tender-meated and has a bill that is not completely hardened and a windpipe that is easily dented.

Ruminant
An animal with a stomach that has four compartments, and a more complex digestive system than other mammals. Ruminants include cattle, sheep, goats, deer, bison, elk, and camels. Swine, dogs, and humans are examples of nonruminants.

 

Back to Top < Previous | Next >
Last Modified Aug 11, 2014