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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Glossary - H

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Halal and Zabiah Halal
Products prepared by federally inspected meat packing plants identified with labels bearing references to “Halal” or “Zabiah Halal” must be handled according to Islamic law and under Islamic authority.

Ham
Ham means pork which comes from the hind leg of a hog. Ham made from the front leg of a hog will be labeled “pork shoulder picnic.” Hams may be fresh, cured, or cured-and-smoked. The usual color for cured ham is deep rose or pink; fresh ham (which is not cured) has the pale pink or beige color of fresh pork roast; country hams and prosciutto (which are dry cured) range from pink to mahogany color. “Turkey ham” must be made from the thigh meat of turkey.

Ham Steak
Another name for center cut ham slices.

Hamburger
“Hamburger” shall consist of chopped fresh and/or frozen beef with or without the addition of beef fat as such and/or seasoning, shall not contain more than 30 percent fat, and shall not contain added water, phosphates, binders, or extenders.

Hazard
A biological, physical, or chemical property that may cause a food to be unsafe for human consumption.

Hazard Analysis And Critical Control Points (HACCP)
A production quality control system now being adopted throughout much of the food industry as a method for minimizing the entry of foodborne pathogens into the food supply in order to protect human health. Under a HACCP (pronounced Ha-sip) system, potential hazards are identified and risks are analyzed in each phase of production; critical control points for preventing such hazards are identified and constantly monitored; and corrective actions are taken when necessary. Record keeping and verification procedures are used to ensure that the system is working. HACCP is one of the major elements of regulations, issued by USDA in July 1996 to control pathogens in meat and poultry products. Under the rules, all meat and poultry slaughter and processing plants with 500 or more employees had to develop and implement, by January 1998, a USDA-approved HACCP plan for each of their processes and products. Plants with 10 to 500 employees implemented HACCP by January 1999, and plants with less than 10 employees implemented the system by January 2000. Under separate rules issued by the Food and Drug Administration on December 5, 1995, seafood processors and importers also were required to implement HACCP plans and be in full compliance by December 1997.

Headcheese
A jellied product consisting predominantly of pork byproducts and seasoning ingredients. It must contain some product from the head.

Hen, Fowl (Baking or Stewing)
A bird of this class is a mature female chicken, usually more than 10 months of age, with meat less tender than that of a roaster, or roasting chicken and nonflexible breastbone tip.

Hickory-Smoked Ham
A cured ham which has been smoked by hanging over burning hickory wood chips in a smokehouse. The ham may not be labeled “hickory smoked” unless hickory wood has been used.

HIMP or HACCP-Based Inspection Models Project
HIMP is an effort to determine how FSIS can improve the use of its online slaughter inspectors and continue to ensure the reduction and/or elimination of defects that pass through traditional inspection. Under this project, FSIS has established performance standards for food safety and non-food safety defects (also known as “other consumer protections” or OCP) found in young chickens, hogs, and turkeys. The food safety performance standards are set at zero to protect consumers from conditions that may be harmful. The OCP performance standards are more stringent than current standards and thus require improved plant performance. Participating plants must revise their HACCP systems to meet these food safety performance standards and establish process control systems to address the OCP concerns. Under this project, FSIS conducts continuous inspection with verification to ensure that performance standards are met.

Honey-Cured
Honey-cured may be shown on the labeling of a cured product if honey is the only sweetening ingredient or is at least half the sweetening ingredients used, and if the honey is used in an amount sufficient to flavor and/or affect the appearance of the finished product.

Humane Methods of Slaughter Act
This Act amended the FMIA by requiring that all meat inspected at Federal establishments by FSIS for use as human food be produced from livestock slaughtered by humane methods in accordance with the Humane Slaughter Act of 1958. The 1958 Act required all livestock in the United States be slaughtered humanely, except for Kosher, Halal, and other religious slaughter.

Humectant
A substance added to foods to help retain moisture and soft texture. An example is glycerine, which may be used in dried meat snacks.

Hydrolyzed (Source) Protein
Flavor enhancers that can be used in meat and poultry products. They are made from protein obtained from a plant source such as soy or wheat, or from an animal source, such as milk. The source used must be identified on the label.

 

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Last Modified Jun 17, 2014