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Pathogen Reduction Dialogue
Panel 1
Introduction of Hazards:
Preparation, Consumption, and the Chain of Transmission
May 6, 2002

 

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Slide 1 of 32 - Introduction of Hazards: Preparation, Consumption, and the Chain of Transmission - Pathogen Reduction Dialogue Panel 1; Presented by Robert V. Tauxe, M.D., M.P.H. Foodborne and Diarrheal Diseases Branch, DBMD, NCID; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
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Slide 2 of 32 - Public health burden of foodborne disease
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Slide 3 of 32 - Foodborne diseases
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Slide 4 of 32 - Major identified foodborne pathogens, United States - circa 2002
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Slide 5 of 32 - Major identified foodborne pathogens, United States - circa 2002 (Cont'd)
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Slide 6 of 32 - The new foodborne zoonoses
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Slide 7 of 32 - The chain of production from farm to table: A generic scenario
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Slide 8 of 32 - The chain of production from farm to table: A generic scenario (Cont'd)
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Slide 9 of 32 - What happens in kitchens?
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Slide 10 of 32 - Outbreaks are multi-factorial events
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Slide 11 of 32 - Introduction of pathogens into food during final preparation: what are the sources?
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Slide 12 of 32 - When contaminated raw foods of animal origin arrive in the kitchen
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Slide 13 of 32 - When an ill food handler arrives in the kitchen
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Slide 14 of 32 - Food may be contaminated by other environmental sources
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Slide 15 of 32 - Prevention strategies for the general public to reduce contamination in the kitchen
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Slide 16 of 32 - Prevention strategies for food establishments to reduce contamination in the kitchen
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Slide 17 of 32 - For institutional kitchens serving high risk populations, foods processed for safety are available now
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Slide 18 of 32 - Food safety education is important but not sufficient to protect  public health
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Slide 19 of 32 - The chain of production from farm to table: Where contamination can occur
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Slide 20 of 32 - Principle sources of pathogens
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Slide 21 of 32 - The chain of production from farm to table: Where contamination can occur (Cont'd)
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Slide 22 of 32 - The chain of production from farm to table: Where contamination can occur with Vibro parahaemolyticus
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Slide 23 of 32 - The chain of production from farm to table: where contamination can occur with Norwalk like viruses
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Slide 24 of 32 - The chain of production from farm to table: Where contamination can occur with zoonotic Salmonella
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Slide 25 of 32 - The chain of production from farm to table: Prevention possible at many points
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Slide 26 of 32 - Schematic map of food industry
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Slide 27 of 32 - Graph of HACCP monitoring samples (FSIS data). Percent of ground beef samples yielding Salmonella, by size of processing plant, and year
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Slide 28 of 32 - Graph of HACCP monitory samples. Pervent of broiler, ground trukey and hog samples yielding Salmonella, by year, large processing plants (FSIS data)
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Slide 29 of 32 - Human illness data (CDC-FoodNet). Change in incidence of foodborne infections relative to 1996
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Slide 30 of 32 - Some future prevention points for foodborne disease (with mocrobial validation)
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Slide 31 of 32 - Some future prevention points for foodborne disease (with mocrobial validation)
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Slide 32 of 32 - Summary
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Last modified: March 18, 2004